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Making A Room Look Good.


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#1 YoussefV

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 09:35 AM

Ok so I did a room scene thats about 25 MB big so I can't upload it and I reached (what you see in the first snapshot)

 

I liked it so much but when I lighted/textured it up disaster struck. (See second image)

 

Any thoughts on how to make a scene like this turn into something like this: (http://www.coolsc.net/imguploads/Image/0911/zp/zy/3d/0713/1.jpg)

 

What's missing? Lighting? better texture? better models??

 

Thanks!!

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#2 Plot

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 03:37 AM

Lighting is the key! What type of lights are you using?



#3 jonmoore

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 03:58 AM

Perfect timing for this sort of question seeing as Jeremy Birn has just released one of his classic training video series for free on Vimeo.
 
Jeremy Birn is a bit of a legend in the world of CG and he has just released the third edition of his classic 'Digital Lighting and Rendering' (software agnostic guide to CG lighting & rendering techniques).
 
 
As a promotion to support the book launch, Jeremy has made his 2008 training DVD, Lighting & Rendering in Maya: Lights and Shadows available for free in full HD via Vimeo.
 
 
Obviously, technology has moved on in the five years since the DVD was originally released, but the fundamental principles remain valid and most of the features Jeremy talks about in Maya have a parallel in C4D.
 
The footage is divided into 18 separate videos, totalling over three hours of training, and comes with downloadable project files and a PDF of course notes.
 
Highly recommended and get the book too - I have all three editions and constantly dip in for a refresher on certain subjects when I get stuck on a project.
 
As a side note, we get all our interns to learn to light scenes without GI or unbiased rendering techniques first. It's the best way to learn about the importance of contrast and shadows when composing your shots. If you can nail lighting without GI/unbiased rendering techniques you'll have so much more control over your scenes once you start using physical simulation techniques. Monsters University was the first Pixar movie to use GI but the lighting in Pixar movies is always first rate. Even though Pixar movies aren't photorealistic the lighting direction most certainly is.
 
One of the best tutorials on lighting I've seen was by Chris Morris at a C4D conference last year. He lights a scene (that's free to downoad from Jeremy Birn's site http://www.3drender.com/ ) without the crutch of GI and the results are a work of art. You can view a video of the event here:
 
 
And back specifically to JB's training this video from the course is a perfect introduction to lighting a room. 
 
 
He uses of spotlights to simulate the bounce light you get with GI and the results are very realistic. And because there's no GI calculation the scene renders in a matter of seconds (and this is with 2008 hardware!). The same techniques can be applied in C4D to drastically reduce both rendering times & artifacts when rendering interior scenes using portal lights (invisible area lights at window openings etc) and bounce lights where required.
 
jm


#4 YoussefV

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 02:15 PM

 

Perfect timing for this sort of question seeing as Jeremy Birn has just released one of his classic training video series for free on Vimeo.
 
Jeremy Birn is a bit of a legend in the world of CG and he has just released the third edition of his classic 'Digital Lighting and Rendering' (software agnostic guide to CG lighting & rendering techniques).
 
 
As a promotion to support the book launch, Jeremy has made his 2008 training DVD, Lighting & Rendering in Maya: Lights and Shadows available for free in full HD via Vimeo.
 
 
Obviously, technology has moved on in the five years since the DVD was originally released, but the fundamental principles remain valid and most of the features Jeremy talks about in Maya have a parallel in C4D.
 
The footage is divided into 18 separate videos, totalling over three hours of training, and comes with downloadable project files and a PDF of course notes.
 
Highly recommended and get the book too - I have all three editions and constantly dip in for a refresher on certain subjects when I get stuck on a project.
 
As a side note, we get all our interns to learn to light scenes without GI or unbiased rendering techniques first. It's the best way to learn about the importance of contrast and shadows when composing your shots. If you can nail lighting without GI/unbiased rendering techniques you'll have so much more control over your scenes once you start using physical simulation techniques. Monsters University was the first Pixar movie to use GI but the lighting in Pixar movies is always first rate. Even though Pixar movies aren't photorealistic the lighting direction most certainly is.
 
One of the best tutorials on lighting I've seen was by Chris Morris at a C4D conference last year. He lights a scene (that's free to downoad from Jeremy Birn's site http://www.3drender.com/ ) without the crutch of GI and the results are a work of art. You can view a video of the event here:
 
 
And back specifically to JB's training this video from the course is a perfect introduction to lighting a room. 
 
 
He uses of spotlights to simulate the bounce light you get with GI and the results are very realistic. And because there's no GI calculation the scene renders in a matter of seconds (and this is with 2008 hardware!). The same techniques can be applied in C4D to drastically reduce both rendering times & artifacts when rendering interior scenes using portal lights (invisible area lights at window openings etc) and bounce lights where required.
 
jm

 

 

 

AWESOME.

 

thank you so much these resources are PRICELESS. the first video alone has almost made my scene look awesome as I've gone for more of an "ominous" feel:

 What do you think?? I think it's a little too dark but the feel is there!! (I'm also conflicted about the greyness of the scene) while I like it's dull tone I feel it's too "standard material-ish" although it's not!!!

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#5 stoat

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 01:04 PM

I'll bump this thread, as that Chris Morris, tutorial is well worth a watch. I downloaded the model of fruit and decided I'd give his lighting tips a whirl. I actually knew most of them but would always just go with the old three point lights. I was pleasantly surprised that when I rendered with g.i. the time didn't go up through the roof. A bog standard render looks pretty g.i. anyway.

 

Yeah the grape colour isn't right yet but that's more to do with me being hopeless at sss.

 

Attached File  fruit.jpg   65.43KB   0 downloads

 

 

 



#6 jonmoore

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 06:49 AM

I'll bump this thread, as that Chris Morris, tutorial is well worth a watch. I downloaded the model of fruit and decided I'd give his lighting tips a whirl. I actually knew most of them but would always just go with the old three point lights. I was pleasantly surprised that when I rendered with g.i. the time didn't go up through the roof. A bog standard render looks pretty g.i. anyway.

 

Yeah the grape colour isn't right yet but that's more to do with me being hopeless at sss.

 

fruit.jpg

 

Great watch isn't it. Highly recommend that Chris Morris video to anybody no matter their level of experience.



#7 stoat

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 07:59 AM

I've only got one quibble with it, and it's no great deal. I think that he must have had a run through, with his workmates. That's all well and good, you should do that, just to get the run time right. However, a little bit of schardenfreude is okay with your mates but can put strangers off a bit. The guy's comments about the car model, I think, put people's noses out. I think he noticed but he then dug himself in a little deeper. It's a pity really, as he should have had a great round of applause and admiration from the audience but didn't they sound cool.

 

What got me, was that the sod, must have been looking over my shoulder! I'm definitely a one for just throwing in a 3 point light set up and wanting to admire my own model, above getting a good shot. But hey, this bloke did know what he was talking about, so I bit my lip and watched it through. I'm glad I did. 



#8 jonmoore

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 10:00 AM

What got me, was that the sod, must have been looking over my shoulder! I'm definitely a one for just throwing in a 3 point light set up and wanting to admire my own model, above getting a good shot. But hey, this bloke did know what he was talking about, so I bit my lip and watched it through. I'm glad I did. 

 

:)

 

The truth is that with sheer volume of pirated software out there, 95% of the renderings you encounter on the web are badly modelled, badly lit and badly textured. And this has got far worse in recent years because of the crutch of things like HDRI and GI lighting techniques (hugely powerful when you know what you're doing or the visual equivalent of cottage cheese when you don't). And as for software like Lumion & Keyshot that supposedly makes visualisation artists of us all without any training, don't get me started!

 

My point isn't about the wrongs and rights of using pirated software but producing good quality renderings takes a mix of art, science and a good deal of experience. Many people that make use of pirated software expect instant results without taking the time to learn the specifics of their ill gotten gains. To my mind Chris's intro was just a reflection of this sad fact.

 

As my dear old grandma said to me many times - the truth always hurts!  ;)






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