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MAXON CINEMA 4D R18 Review by Brady Betzel

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Review by Brady Betzel
 http://postperspective.com/

Each year I get to test out some of the latest and greatest software and hardware releases our industry has to offer. One of my favorites — and most challenging — is Maxon’s Cinema 4D. I say challenging because while I love Cinema 4D, I don’t use it every day. So, in order to test it thoroughly, I watched tutorials on Cineversity to brush up on what I forgot and what’s new. Even though I don’t use it every day, I do love it.

I’ve reviewed Cinema 4D Release 15 through R18. I started using the product when I was studying at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks, California, which coincidentally is about 10 minutes from Maxon’s Newbury Park office.

Each version update has been packed full of remarkable additions and updates. From the grass generator in R15, addition of the Reflectance channel in R16, lens distortion tools in R17 to the multitude of updates in R18 — Cinema 4D keeps on cranking out the hits. I say multitude because there are a ton of updates packed into the latest Cinema 4D Release 18 update. You can check out a complete list of them as well as comparisons between Cinema 4D Studio, Visualize, Broadcast, Prime, BodyPaint 3D and Lite Release 18 versions on the Maxon site.

For this review, I’m going to touch on three of what I think are the most compelling updates in Release 18: the new Voronoi Fracture, Thin Film Shader and the Push Apart Effector. Yes, I know there are a bazillion other great updates to Cinema 4D R18 — such as Weight Painting, new Knife Tools, Inverse Ambient Occlusion, the ability to save cache files externally and many more — but I’m going to stick to the features that I think stand out.

Keep in mind that I am using Cinema 4D Studio R18 for this review, so if you don’t have Studio, some of the features might not be available in your version. For instance, I am going to touch on some of the MoGraph toolset updates, and those are only inside the Studio and Broadcast versions. Finally, while you should use a super powerful workstation to get the smoothest and most robust experience when using Cinema 4D R18, I am using a tablet that uses a quad core Intel i7 3.1GHz processor, 8GB of RAM and an Intel Iris graphics 6100 GPU. Definitely on the lower end of processing power for this app, but it works and I have to credit Maxon for making it work so well.


Voronoi Fracture

If, like me, you’ve never heard of the term Voronoi, check out the first paragraph of this Wiki page. A very simple way to imagine a Voronoi diagram is a bunch of cell-like polygons that are all connected (there’s a much more intricate and deeply mathematical definition, but I can barely understand it, and it’s really beyond the scope of this review). In Cinema 4D Studio R18, the Voronoi Fracture object allows us to easily, and I mean really easily, procedurally break apart objects like MoGraph text, or any other object, without the need for external third-party plug-ins such as Nitro4D’s Thrausi.

To apply Voronoi Fracture in as few steps as possible, you apply the Voronoi Fracture located in the MoGraph menu to your object, adjust parameters under the Sources menu (like distribution type or point amount) add effectors to cause dispersion, keyframe values and render. With a little practice you can explode your raytraced MoGraph text in no time. The best part is your object will not look fractured until animated, which in the past took some work so this is a great update.


Thin Film Shader

Things that are hard to recreate in a photorealistic way are transparent objects, such as glass bottles, windows and bubbles. In Cinema 4D R18, Maxon has added the new Thin Film Shader, which can add the film-like quality that you see on bubbles or soap. It’s an incredible addition to Cinema 4D, furthering the idea that Maxon is concentrating on adding features that improve efficiency for people like me who want to use Cinema 4D, but sometimes don’t because making a material like Thin Film will take a long time.

To apply the Thin Film to your object, find the Reflectance channel of your material that you want to add the Thin Film property to add a new Beckmann or GGX layer, lower the Specular Strength of this layer to zero, under Layer Color choose Texture > Effects > Thin Film. From there, if you want to see the Thin Film as a true layer of film you need to change your composite setting to Add on your layer; you should then see it properly. You can get some advanced tips from the great tutorials over at Cineversity and from Andy Needham (Twitter: @imcalledandy) on lynda.com. One tip I learned from Andy is to change the Index of Refraction to get some different looks, which can be found under the Shader properties.


Push Apart Effector

The new Push Apart Effector is a simple but super-powerful addition to Cinema 4D. The easiest way to describe the Push Apart Effector is to imagine a bunch of objects in an array or using a Cloner where all of your objects are touching — the Push Apart Effector helps to push them away from each other. To decrease the intersection of your clones, you can dial-in the specific radius of your objects (like a sphere) and then tell Cinema 4D R18 how many times you want it to look through the scene by specifying iterations. The more iterations the less chance your objects will intersect, but the more time it will take to compute.
 


Thin Film Render
 

If you are an Adobe After Effects user, don’t forget that you automatically get a free version of Cinema 4D bundled with After Effects — Cinema 4D Lite. Even though you have to have After Effects open to use the Cinema 4D Lite, it is still a great way to dip your toes into the 3D world, and maybe even bring your projects back into After Effects to do some compositing.

Cinema 4D Studio R18’s pricing breaks down like this: Commercial Pricing/Annual License Pricing/Upgrade R17 to R18 pricing — Cinema 4D Studio Release 18: $3,695/$650 /$995; Cinema 4D Visualize Release 18: $2,295/$500/$795; Cinema 4D Broadcast Release 18: $1,695/$400 /$795; Cinema 4D Prime Release 18: $995/$250/$395.

Another interesting option is Maxon’s short-term licensing in three- or six-month chunks for the Studio version ($600/$1,100) and 75 percent of the fees you pay for a short-term license can be applied to your purchase of a full license later. Keep in mind, when using such a powerful and robust software like Cinema 4D you are making an investment that will payoff with concentrated effort in learning the software. With a few hours of training from some of the top trainers — like Tim Clapham on www.hellolux.com, Greyscalegorilla.com and Motionworks.com — you will be off and running in 3D land.

For everyday Cinema 4D creations and inspiration, check out @beeple_crap on Instagram. He produces amazing work all the time.

In this review, I tested some of the new updates to Cinema 4D Studio R18 with sample projects from Andy Needham’s Lynda.com class Cinema 4D R18: New Features and Joren Kandel’s awesome website, which offers tons of free content to play with while learning the new tools.

 

Summing Up

I love Maxon’s continual development of Cinema 4D in Release 18. I specifically love that while they are adding new features, like Weight Painting and Update Knife Tools, they are also helping to improve efficiency for people like me who love to work in Cinema 4D but sometimes skip it because of the steep learning curve and technical know-how you need in order to operate it. You should not fear though, I cannot emphasize how much you can learn at Cineversity, Lynda.com, and on YouTube from an expert like Sean Frangella. Whether you are new to the world of Cinema 4D, mildly experienced like me, or an expert you can always learn something new.

Something I love about Maxon’s licensing for education is that if you go to a qualified school, you can get a free Cinema 4D license. Instructors can get access to Cineversity to use the tutorials in their curriculum as well as project files to use. It’s an amazing resource.


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Thanks but not really what I would call a review, more of a summary of a couple of new features. I miss my epic reviews of the new C4D versions but that's another story.

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16 minutes ago, Visionnext said:

Still waiting for the improvements regarding Bodypaint...

We all do! :) 

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On 2/26/2017 at 1:38 PM, Visionnext said:

Still waiting for the improvements regarding Bodypaint...

And @3DKiwi will probably be offered a free copy for a review. Alas, he may have forgotten the software.

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On 2/25/2017 at 0:13 PM, 3DKiwi said:

Thanks but not really what I would call a review, more of a summary of a couple of new features. I miss my epic reviews of the new C4D versions but that's another story.

What you may miss even more is the joy of being a c4d rockstar. You earned (100x over) a pivotal place in the community and in our hearts. You can always make a comeback you know. Steve Jobs did.

Next Computer was never going to feel as sweet...and I suspect it's the same w/Modo. Anyway...no need to reply.

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49 minutes ago, Icecaveman said:

What you may miss even more is the joy of being a c4d rockstar. You earned (100x over) a pivotal place in the community and in our hearts. You can always make a comeback you know. Steve Jobs did.

Next Computer was never going to feel as sweet...and I suspect it's the same w/Modo. Anyway...no need to reply.

Hi. Re comeback. That all depends on Maxon and The Foundry. I use whatever 3D software that I think meets my 3D needs. Currently that's Modo. The last 2 releases of Modo were pretty good so I'm happy to stick with it. Now if Maxon completely replaces Bodypaint with a complete rewrite, makes C4D a lot quicker, Nodal workflow for materials and some modelling enhancements I would have to give serious thought to coming back. Sadly for Cinema 4D users I doubt that R19 is going to be the big and long overdue major upgrade that many want. Modo equally needs some serious work under the hood as it's pretty slow with lots of objects and slow at deforming objects.

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Kiwi,No doubt that Modo is a very fine program with it's merits and strengths. I do think, however that you'll be back at some point. Just a hunch. 

You will likely continue to use Modo for some things...but as Dorothy said, "There's no place like home." And I suspect C4D is your ultimate home...the app and the community that brings you the most joy and satisfaction.

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2 hours ago, Icecaveman said:

Kiwi,No doubt that Modo is a very fine program with it's merits and strengths. I do think, however that you'll be back at some point. Just a hunch. 

You will likely continue to use Modo for some things...but as Dorothy said, "There's no place like home." And I suspect C4D is your ultimate home...the app and the community that brings you the most joy and satisfaction.

Modo has a pretty good community, comparable to the C4D community.

Actually I think Blender is a dark horse. A fixed up interface and a few modelling enhancements and I could easily use it. I could easily end up there in the future.

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Kiwi is a legend. Anytime you want to review a C4D version I'm sure we'd all love it.

 

This review was more like a press release. I'm not sure what the point of it is, honestly, besides "C4D has some things! I am an editor."

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