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The Birth of Motion Graphics

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Igor    467

Really impressive to see where we are now and how was it then. :) 

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nerv    278

Ooh I love this.  I remember being a kid in the 80s and thinking that stuff looked so cool.  

 

And as an audio synthesizer aficionado, I love the idea of turning a knob and seeing an immediate result.  

 

Good stuff. 

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lopakam    41

I saw that, but you may also want to read about Ernie Kovacs.  In my opinion, he may have been the first.  Real interesting guy.  What he did in the 1950s with early TV cameras is amazing.

 

Mark

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bobc4d    90

that thing should be in the Smithsonian to hold for posterity 

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Zmotive    57

Yeah I remember watching TV graphics like that as a kid. Never knew how they were made (always suspected some type of console and a machine to record the screen output to film). Amazing stewardship by that guy to keep a piece of history (literally - since there are only a couple left) running and in good order.

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People working in the real-time video field will be very familiar with the names Rutt and Etra (because every RT system has a digital Rutt Etra effect) the geniuses behind the Rutt/Etra Video synthesiser which laid a lot of the ground work for electronic video effects and motion graphics.

 

http://www.audiovisualizers.com/toolshak/vidsynth/ruttetra/ruttetra.htm

 

 

But if you want to go further back to the birth of analogue (film) Motion Graphics you absolutely cannot ignore the work of Len Lye for the GPO film unit and his contemporary Oskar Fischinger. This was the real birth of Mograph, just consider the art in the process as well as the end result. No cloners here, just painstaking stop motion and genius.

 

 

 

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arail    22

Imagine how futuristic that must have looked in 1936

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nerv    278

That Fischinger piece is AMAZING. Best thing I've seen all week. 

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Myself, my favourite fossil finding goes for Ivan Sutherland, demonstrating this piece of machine:

 

 

I can say that I started with 3D in a great deal because of the massive blood, sweat and tears that had to roll just so that we simple peasants could spend our days in this creative haze... that was inspiring for my entrance in the field.
All you guys above gave beautiful examples of historic achievements in the gigantic field of computer graphics, but I like to wonder sometimes about all the other geniuses on wich we depend on for developing our craft. You can go back mileniums just to acknowledge again and again that we owe it all to the crazy unique talents of the past.
Where would 3D be without Descartes? What about that old tale about Leonardo da Vinci declaring just "inventing the world" after elaborating his perspective laws? What to say about Goethe, who, retired after his completed masterpiece, decided to fiddle around with some color studies and gave us the first color wheel diagram? Go back a while till the greek mathematicians, try showing up in Euclid's workstation... "Hey, Euclid, you're going to the party? I heard there's gonna be girls", and he would say "Sorry, man. But I decided to waste my whole life trying to figure out something that will not have any real practical use till generations from now". Babylonians way before decided the old 360 degrees to segment the circumference and till this day we use a convention of measurement that probably had its roots on astrological mystic purposes.
-
All being said, Hats off to Douglas Engelbart, Ivan Sutherland, Pierre Bezier and the such, but I love to waste some idle viewport contemplation to remember that we're really just sitting on the lap of the gods...

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18 hours ago, DanielCFilho said:

Myself, my favourite fossil finding goes for Ivan Sutherland, demonstrating this piece of machine:

 

 

I can say that I started with 3D in a great deal because of the massive blood, sweat and tears that had to roll just so that we simple peasants could spend our days in this creative haze... that was inspiring for my entrance in the field.
All you guys above gave beautiful examples of historic achievements in the gigantic field of computer graphics, but I like to wonder sometimes about all the other geniuses on wich we depend on for developing our craft. You can go back mileniums just to acknowledge again and again that we owe it all to the crazy unique talents of the past.
Where would 3D be without Descartes? What about that old tale about Leonardo da Vinci declaring just "inventing the world" after elaborating his perspective laws? What to say about Goethe, who, retired after his completed masterpiece, decided to fiddle around with some color studies and gave us the first color wheel diagram? Go back a while till the greek mathematicians, try showing up in Euclid's workstation... "Hey, Euclid, you're going to the party? I heard there's gonna be girls", and he would say "Sorry, man. But I decided to waste my whole life trying to figure out something that will not have any real practical use till generations from now". Babylonians way before decided the old 360 degrees to segment the circumference and till this day we use a convention of measurement that probably had its roots on astrological mystic purposes.
-
All being said, Hats off to Douglas Engelbart, Ivan Sutherland, Pierre Bezier and the such, but I love to waste some idle viewport contemplation to remember that we're really just sitting on the lap of the gods...

 

Yes we all stand on the shoulders of giants but that doesn't stop one of us becoming a giant too.

 

Modern cosmology owes much Newton and Einstein but that doesn't stop scientists like Nima Arkarni-Hamed taking the subject further. This bloke is a bonfire genius and such an engaging speaker who is taking our understanding of the physical universe (multiverse) right back to the instant of the big bang. As science delves deeper and understands more we realise our most accurate and successful theory that of quantum physics, the standard model of particle physics, cannot give a reason for gravity being such a weak force compared to all other forces (known as the hierarchy problem) and why our calculations of the cosmological constant are 120 orders of magnitude wrong. so we're missing something BIG. At this point some invoke God others roll up their sleeves and continue the research.

 

There's always new physics to discover and there's always new art to create, it's the human condition to go forward.

 

 

 

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