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Isleofgough    7

Regarding crashes: houdini is not as stable as C4D, at least on OSX. The need to use VEX or python will come up well before one needs to do anything more than xpresso in C4D. As a modeling alternative, I don’t know anyone who thinks it is as easy or versatile for most modeling compared with C4D, modo, or whatever. It is a great program and very powerful, but it is still a bit of a niche in the 3D world for special effects. The indie version is no doubt the best deal of any 3D program other than blender.

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Sreckom    11
Quote

The need to use VEX or python will come up well before one needs to do anything more than xpresso in C4D.

 

I would not agree on this part, you can do A LOT before even touch VEX or Python.

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grain    107

I've used houdini a bit, definitely not an expert, but I would say it's the perfect companion to C4D rather than a replacement for it. The two co-exist beautifully. Houdini engine makes it even easier to get them working together, but I often just use Alembic to go from one to the other. IMO nothing beats Cinema for speed when doing look dev, motion graphics, concept and design work. Houdini allows you to make procedural .. anything, basically. But sometimes you don't need that level of control, you just need to put some simple objects in, nice textures, and smash out something quickly.

 

Side note, they've been mentioned before - Entagma. I just want to highlight their most recent houdini tutorial, it's fantastic. So many quick things they do that show how houdini's procedural nature give you a lot of creative options.

http://www.entagma.com/procedural-modeling-quilling/#more-1070

 

The way I would use this would be to build the setup in houdini, and then use houdini engine / alembic to export it to Cinema to do camera moves, texture, light, animation. You could do it all in houdini but for me Cinema is just way easier and more responsive for that stuff. 

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nerv    278

Speaking of Entagma aka Aixponsa, you can clearly hear and see how C4D is still a crucial part of their workflow on this webinar*:

 

http://info.nvidia.com/redshift-gpu-rendering-aixsponza-reg-page.html

 

So I’d be careful perpetuating the myth that they’ve completely abandoned C4D for Houdini. 

 

* the webinar is not live anymore but I think you can watch a recording. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • Here's one workflow tip that could be the gateway drug into Houdini for those who haven't yet dipped their toes in the  Houdini water.

     

    If you've got a C4D scene that is making your viewport crawl and you want to check animation timings bake the scene out as an Alembic and use Houdini Apprentice as your 3D flip book. This is better than rendering preview animations as once the Alembic scene is imported into Houdini can be viewed in full 3d and view in RT at the project frame rate. If you qualify for Houdini Indie then you've got the added benefit of being able to export an Alembic back into C4D if you've altered it.

     

    Also Houdini has an excellent OpenGL renderer so while there you can spit out client test renders in OpenGL without all the scene object cluttering the render.

     

    Redshift users can make use of rsProxy files to send textured objects from one application to the other. Houdini Indie does not allow export of full scene Proxies but you can send a full scene proxy from C4D to Indie.

     

    Saving your XP Cache in Houdini bgeo format means you can access you XP particle simulation in Houdini and as an added bonus all data you've applied to particles such as age, colour and mass etc are available in Houdini. Houdini handles massive particle simulations with ease so if you've got an XP simulation chugging in C4D cache it out as bgeo and view it in real time in Houdini.

     

    Currently my XP knowledge vastly outweighs my Houdini particle knowledge so I'm trying to crack the problem of XP's lack of dynamic particle trails with a combination of exporting XP particles over to Houdini then seeing if I can attach dynamic trails to the particles that will interact with other scene geometry. I think this is a good example of using the strengths of each package to get a big win, now I just need to work out how to do it.

     

    You may not want to ditch C4D from your workflow like me but Houdini Indie for $200 is a Swiss Army knife for any workflow hobbyist or professional. Start small then move up to using Houdini for things that it's traditionally strong at as Dynamics, fluids and particles then send them back to C4D and have a symbiotic relationship between the applications. With both applications open on different desktops it's like having a 3D über application open.

     

    Houdini Indie for the price of a plugin you've got one heck of a workflow accelerator and god level dynamics system at your disposal. Even if you only use Houdini Apprentice as a 3d flip book it's worth it.

     

     

     

     

     

     

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