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Leaving C4D-Land.

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Regarding crashes: houdini is not as stable as C4D, at least on OSX. The need to use VEX or python will come up well before one needs to do anything more than xpresso in C4D. As a modeling alternative, I don’t know anyone who thinks it is as easy or versatile for most modeling compared with C4D, modo, or whatever. It is a great program and very powerful, but it is still a bit of a niche in the 3D world for special effects. The indie version is no doubt the best deal of any 3D program other than blender.

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The need to use VEX or python will come up well before one needs to do anything more than xpresso in C4D.

 

I would not agree on this part, you can do A LOT before even touch VEX or Python.

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I've used houdini a bit, definitely not an expert, but I would say it's the perfect companion to C4D rather than a replacement for it. The two co-exist beautifully. Houdini engine makes it even easier to get them working together, but I often just use Alembic to go from one to the other. IMO nothing beats Cinema for speed when doing look dev, motion graphics, concept and design work. Houdini allows you to make procedural .. anything, basically. But sometimes you don't need that level of control, you just need to put some simple objects in, nice textures, and smash out something quickly.

 

Side note, they've been mentioned before - Entagma. I just want to highlight their most recent houdini tutorial, it's fantastic. So many quick things they do that show how houdini's procedural nature give you a lot of creative options.

http://www.entagma.com/procedural-modeling-quilling/#more-1070

 

The way I would use this would be to build the setup in houdini, and then use houdini engine / alembic to export it to Cinema to do camera moves, texture, light, animation. You could do it all in houdini but for me Cinema is just way easier and more responsive for that stuff. 

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Speaking of Entagma aka Aixponsa, you can clearly hear and see how C4D is still a crucial part of their workflow on this webinar*:

 

http://info.nvidia.com/redshift-gpu-rendering-aixsponza-reg-page.html

 

So I’d be careful perpetuating the myth that they’ve completely abandoned C4D for Houdini. 

 

* the webinar is not live anymore but I think you can watch a recording. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • Here's one workflow tip that could be the gateway drug into Houdini for those who haven't yet dipped their toes in the  Houdini water.

     

    If you've got a C4D scene that is making your viewport crawl and you want to check animation timings bake the scene out as an Alembic and use Houdini Apprentice as your 3D flip book. This is better than rendering preview animations as once the Alembic scene is imported into Houdini can be viewed in full 3d and view in RT at the project frame rate. If you qualify for Houdini Indie then you've got the added benefit of being able to export an Alembic back into C4D if you've altered it.

     

    Also Houdini has an excellent OpenGL renderer so while there you can spit out client test renders in OpenGL without all the scene object cluttering the render.

     

    Redshift users can make use of rsProxy files to send textured objects from one application to the other. Houdini Indie does not allow export of full scene Proxies but you can send a full scene proxy from C4D to Indie.

     

    Saving your XP Cache in Houdini bgeo format means you can access you XP particle simulation in Houdini and as an added bonus all data you've applied to particles such as age, colour and mass etc are available in Houdini. Houdini handles massive particle simulations with ease so if you've got an XP simulation chugging in C4D cache it out as bgeo and view it in real time in Houdini.

     

    Currently my XP knowledge vastly outweighs my Houdini particle knowledge so I'm trying to crack the problem of XP's lack of dynamic particle trails with a combination of exporting XP particles over to Houdini then seeing if I can attach dynamic trails to the particles that will interact with other scene geometry. I think this is a good example of using the strengths of each package to get a big win, now I just need to work out how to do it.

     

    You may not want to ditch C4D from your workflow like me but Houdini Indie for $200 is a Swiss Army knife for any workflow hobbyist or professional. Start small then move up to using Houdini for things that it's traditionally strong at as Dynamics, fluids and particles then send them back to C4D and have a symbiotic relationship between the applications. With both applications open on different desktops it's like having a 3D über application open.

     

    Houdini Indie for the price of a plugin you've got one heck of a workflow accelerator and god level dynamics system at your disposal. Even if you only use Houdini Apprentice as a 3d flip book it's worth it.

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    Well, despite the steep learning curve, I think I'm sold on Houdini. And the last straw was the awesomeness of X-Particles 4...let me explain --

     

    As an indie filmmaker, I am interested in creating high-end VFX for my own projects; but without a paying clientele, the combined cost of C4D Studio plus something like Real Flow, or Turbulence FD or X-Particles 4 is simply not financially feasible. So how does someone like me tap into the creative potential that something like X-Particles 4 offers, while still be able to ...you know...eat? ;-)

     

    Houdini Indie is too compelling to ignore anymore. What I am seeing is basically an app that, for what breaks down to $16/month, gives me the full power of the above-mentioned plugins and then some. 

     

    As much as I dread the endless tutorials that I will need to watch just to get back to the type of familiarity that I currently have with C4D, I'd have to be an idiot not to push forward into Houdini-land as quickly as possible. Since I'm not really a modeler (I rely on numerous TurboSquid and bash-kits models available for the most part), I'm not terribly concerned about the fact that Houdini probably isn't the best choice for modeling.

     

    In addition, the strong integration of RedShift in Houdini is yet another compelling factor impossible to ignore.

     

    All in all, I dragged my feet and ignored Houdini for far too long. Reading the more recent posts in this thread have convinced me that despite the learning obstacles that Houdini presents, it will be worthwhile in the end.

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    Good luck. For some things Houdini is easier than Cinema 4D (even in modeling), since it doesn't have to change from parametric to editable to perform certain operations the way C4D does. Some simple things are a bear to do in Houdini (materials, no polypen tool, nonintuitive NPR rendering,  limited sculpting, need to delve into VEX far more than one would need to use xpresso and remember completely different set of functions in hscript). If you want to specialize in VFX, it does make sense to move to Houdini, but you will still need to be a decent modeler.  I love Houdini, but I renewed my MSA for C4D.

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    Recently bought Houdini indie. Had a few breakthroughs and no longer feeling totally frustrated by it. 

     

    All that said... 

     

    this newfound understanding of Houdini has made me appreciate C4D even more. Its immediacy is simply unmatched, especially for the majority of the work I’m paid to do. I rarely ever need simulation-based or organic VFX, and whenever I do, XP4 and TFD cover all those bases - while keeping me in a familiar environment. I work so quickly in C4D that it’s actually counterproductive to distract myself with another DCC, let alone one that (although very flexible) requires more of a time investment to get anything done. 

     

    I’ll keep Houdini around as a side tool, for little experiments or the rare situation where XP4 or TFD aren’t achieving what I need them to. But it’s safe to say it won’t be replacing C4D as my primary platform anytime soon.  

     

    Anyways, again, my 2 cents / YMMV / etc. 

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    15 hours ago, nerv said:

    Recently bought Houdini indie. Had a few breakthroughs and no longer feeling totally frustrated by it. 

     

    All that said... 

     

    this newfound understanding of Houdini has made me appreciate C4D even more. Its immediacy is simply unmatched, especially for the majority of the work I’m paid to do. I rarely ever need simulation-based or organic VFX, and whenever I do, XP4 and TFD cover all those bases - while keeping me in a familiar environment. I work so quickly in C4D that it’s actually counterproductive to distract myself with another DCC, let alone one that (although very flexible) requires more of a time investment to get anything done. 

     

    I’ll keep Houdini around as a side tool, for little experiments or the rare situation where XP4 or TFD aren’t achieving what I need them to. But it’s safe to say it won’t be replacing C4D as my primary platform anytime soon.  

     

    Anyways, again, my 2 cents / YMMV / etc. 

    I had the exact same conclusion recently as well. In fact, learning Houdini has increased my XP game quite a bit. I do get a little frustrated by the speed of things in C4D, but hopefully R20 remedies that to some extent.  I don't have TfD, so smoke/fire in XP is still a bit slow/limited, but the potential is there.

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    Since buying a Houdini indie licence recently my life has been better.

     

    the multithread performance makes c4d feel like a bit of a dinosaur to use.

     

    Im also planning to leave ship vray for redshift and Houdini looks like the perfect platform. But, it's worth noting to the not yet converted that Houdini indie limits the render size to HD.

     

    I will keep my msa for at least one more year, I agree with much of what has been said about accessibility, but don't agree that it is limited to vfx workflows. From what I understand, Houdini is being backed as the application to replace Maya.

     

    The side fx sales strategy is clever, keep indie cheap for long enough to have users of all platforms keep a copy running next to their main 3d application and then take over the world in 10 years when we have all learnt vex.

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    @spiralstair don't forget you're also a coder. so your brain is apparently made for houdini ;) average brain sized artists like us have a much harder time wrapping our heads around an app like this.

    i think @nerv didn't say it's just for vfx, he said he uses it just for very special vfx tasks, because for everything else he's way more comfortable in c4d and thus can produce faster. most people i know about use it that way, as an addition to fill the gaps their app of choice can't deliver.

     

    i'm very impressed with houdini and i think it could become a serious thread to all the other apps out there, well in fact it already puts them under a lot of pressure. but they can add as many fancy features as they want, as long as they don't make it a little bit more straight forward to operate the majority of CG artists will use other apps like maya max modo and c4d. 

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    10 hours ago, everfresh said:

    @spiralstair don't forget you're also a coder. so your brain is apparently made for houdini ;) average brain sized artists like us have a much harder time wrapping our heads around an app like this.

    i think @nerv didn't say it's just for vfx, he said he uses it just for very special vfx tasks, because for everything else he's way more comfortable in c4d and thus can produce faster. most people i know about use it that way, as an addition to fill the gaps their app of choice can't deliver.

     

    i'm very impressed with houdini and i think it could become a serious thread to all the other apps out there, well in fact it already puts them under a lot of pressure. but they can add as many fancy features as they want, as long as they don't make it a little bit more straight forward to operate the majority of CG artists will use other apps like maya max modo and c4d. 

    Yep. That’s what I meant when I mentioned the VFX thing. Thanks for clearing it up. And I agree with all of this.  

     

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