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JustBegun

Is it worth investing in a VFX school?

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I'm still a C4D beginner, though I've been using it for a couple years now.

I'm a visual artist for films and commercials, I mainly use After Effects.

I sometimes use C4D and buy models off the internet, but I know nothing about modeling, texturing, animating or lighting up a scene.

Is it worth investing in a VFX school where they teach students 3D? Or is it pointless and can be learned by oneself?

3D is the future, the industry rate is growing unbelievably fast and is thirsty for young 3D artists.

After Effects is old-school now.

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19 minutes ago, JustBegun said:

Or is it pointless and can be learned by oneself?

That one :) There is such a wealth of tutorial content for free (and paid) online that I think that makes sit-in-a-classroom 3D courses all but redundant, except at the highest, specialist levels. And yet some people want that, or their employers are happy to pay for it, so there remains a market.

 

But if you can focus, and have time to learn and practice on your own, and are on this forum, then I see no advantage at all to paying a massive sum of cash to sit in a classroom doing it instead for a few weeks or months. I suppose it could be argued that it may take longer to do on your own, but I'd contest that too - if you have the sort of people you find here directing you to what you need to see, then you will be as well-guided as any course participant.

 

Watch this video, and all the others in the series that follow it and you will be off to a very good start.

 

 

PS: AFX might have been around for a while, but we shouldn't write it off as old-school;  it remains the go-to Post solution for anyone using Cinema and doing animation.

 

CBR

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  • 1 hour ago, Cerbera said:

    That one :)

    CBR

    Whoa, man. Glad to see you're still around :)

    I remember you helped me years ago with some of my projects.

    Well, that's good news I can pull it off on my own. I've thought about it for years now, but I got no excuses now ;)

     

    Gonna watch the video you sent along with the others attached to it.

    Do you also think it is possible to learn to composite 3D models into real footages?

    Most of the compositing tutorials on youtube are quite cheap.

     

    Can I come up with something like that?

     

    The 3D effects are SICK TO THE BONE!

    How did they get the lighting of the claws so right? And how did they motion track this? Through AE or the 3D software itself?

    It looks too accurate to be an effect.

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    1 minute ago, JustBegun said:

    Can I come up with something like that?

    Not initially ;) There will have been about 30 people involved in the VFX for that shot, each one an expert in their field, with decades of experience behind them. It will take years for one person to get to that level. But that is not to say the journey won't be fun at every stage of the way.

     

    3 minutes ago, JustBegun said:

    Do you also think it is possible to learn to composite 3D models into real footages?

    Yes. There are tutorials for every aspect of this and quite a few of them specifically for Cinema. But watch that first series I gave you before you get onto any of those, as you need to know what you are doing in the program before you tackle that sort of thing.

     

    5 minutes ago, JustBegun said:

    Whoa, man. Glad to see you're still around :)

    Ha ha, yes, I've been at this for a while. I didn't go to VFX school in case you were wondering :)

     

    CBR

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  • 1 hour ago, Cerbera said:

    But that is not to say the journey won't be fun at every stage of the way.

    Haha, no doubts, it looks extremely complicated.

    I love your positive spirit and the way you encourage people to keep doing what they love.

     

    Yes. There are tutorials for every aspect of this and quite a few of them specifically for Cinema. But watch that first series I gave you before you get onto any of those, as you need to know what you are doing in the program before you tackle that sort of thing.

    Absolutely~

     

    Ha ha, yes, I've been at this for a while. I didn't go to VFX school in case you were wondering :)

    WHAT?! I was so certain you had a degree in the field. That's very respectable!

    I admire your work and the tips you spread around here.

    Are you gonna come up with a new project soon? :)

    White ~

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    Just now, JustBegun said:

    Are you gonna come up with a new project soon? :)

    Oh I would have thought so - just a bit tied up on client stuff at the moment...

     

    CBR

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    It really depends on what you intend to do. If you intend to learn 3d and have a related job in the industry Some art directors/studios hiring talent will want a university type degree in 3D animation / CG etc. Some won't care, if you can make awesome art, you can make awesome art, it doesn't nessisarily matter where you gained those skills, as long as you do indeed have those skills. Places like Pixar, frame store, the mill etc will hire some talent straight from uni or offer internships to students currently taking associated university degrees. So in that respect getting an official shinny university degree sticker will help you get on your way in some amount, but ultimately it I'll come down to more than what's technically on paper, more your portfolio, and arsnel of assosiated 3d skills that make you valuable. As far as just learning goes. I think teaching yourself could potentially offer alot more advantages over a class room. It will allow you to taper your learning around other things like time constraints and work commitments aswell as give you the opportunity to focus your learning curve on something you specially want to do, rather than learning things you may not need like rigging etc

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    Hello JustBegun, I make Cinema 4D tutorials, here's a link to my site

    Digitalmeat.uk

    There's plenty of video tutorials there dealing with a wide range of aspects of Cinema 4D.

     

    I also have a Patreon page in which i provide more in-depth tutorials such as "Hard Surface Modelling" and "XPresso"

     

    Quote

    Do you also think it is possible to learn to composite 3D models into real footages?

     

    Here's some links to tutorials I've done on this subject

    Motion Tracker

    Projection Mapping

    Object Tracking Pt1

    Object Tracking Pt2

     

    Here's one on Global Illumination


    Global Illumination



     

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    The classes you would take at a school are arguably the least important thing of participating in a formal program. Most of your learning is from practice, and, as others have said, the little bit of direction you need can be found online for free or very cheap by comparison.

     

    However, the thing that is extremely difficult to recreate outside of a formal program is the means to gain experience. In school, you've got classmates who are equally dedicated to spending all their time learning and creating. Outside of a program, people are either already working in the field and don't have time to work on a "student" project, or they're hobbyists who have full-time jobs and can't commit the way that another student would. 

     

    For example: I pursued live-action filmmaking in college and didn't turn to computer animation until I graduated. I never found people to work with, so I did everything by myself (while working full-time). 10 years later, I had learned enough to launch a short film and completed it 2 years later.

    So it takes a great deal of focus and effort to either learn by yourself or to find people to learn and practice with. If you decide to go that route, you really need to treat it like a full-time job and really dedicate yourself to the endeavor. When you get stuck with a full-time day job, and try to do it on the side - that's when it takes 10 years.

    Lastly, a school can also provide you with a lot of connections. You form strong relationships with teachers and classmates, which often turn into future opportunities. Depending on the program, alumni may remain fairly loyal, and be more willing to hire other alumni when given the opportunity. 

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  • 19 hours ago, DeCarlo said:

    The classes you would take at a school are arguably the least important thing of participating in a formal program. Most of your learning is from practice, and, as others have said, the little bit of direction you need can be found online for free or very cheap by comparison.

     

    However, the thing that is extremely difficult to recreate outside of a formal program is the means to gain experience. In school, you've got classmates who are equally dedicated to spending all their time learning and creating. Outside of a program, people are either already working in the field and don't have time to work on a "student" project, or they're hobbyists who have full-time jobs and can't commit the way that another student would. 

     

    For example: I pursued live-action filmmaking in college and didn't turn to computer animation until I graduated. I never found people to work with, so I did everything by myself (while working full-time). 10 years later, I had learned enough to launch a short film and completed it 2 years later.

    So it takes a great deal of focus and effort to either learn by yourself or to find people to learn and practice with. If you decide to go that route, you really need to treat it like a full-time job and really dedicate yourself to the endeavor. When you get stuck with a full-time day job, and try to do it on the side - that's when it takes 10 years.

    Lastly, a school can also provide you with a lot of connections. You form strong relationships with teachers and classmates, which often turn into future opportunities. Depending on the program, alumni may remain fairly loyal, and be more willing to hire other alumni when given the opportunity. 

    True, it does take a lot of time, dedication and focus to become good at something, no doubts.

    Is there anything else school has advantage of over self-learners other than connection-making?

    The hardest part, for me at least, is to find people in the same field who are willing to dedicate their time to create projects.

    It seems like youtubers have an easy time creating short films, like Film Riot, Red Giant and Video copilot.

    I really wish I had similar people to work with.

     

    On 4/19/2018 at 1:07 PM, VECTOR said:

    It really depends on what you intend to do. If you intend to learn 3d and have a related job in the industry Some art directors/studios hiring talent will want a university type degree in 3D animation / CG etc. Some won't care, if you can make awesome art, you can make awesome art, it doesn't nessisarily matter where you gained those skills, as long as you do indeed have those skills. Places like Pixar, frame store, the mill etc will hire some talent straight from uni or offer internships to students currently taking associated university degrees. So in that respect getting an official shinny university degree sticker will help you get on your way in some amount, but ultimately it I'll come down to more than what's technically on paper, more your portfolio, and arsnel of assosiated 3d skills that make you valuable. As far as just learning goes. I think teaching yourself could potentially offer alot more advantages over a class room. It will allow you to taper your learning around other things like time constraints and work commitments aswell as give you the opportunity to focus your learning curve on something you specially want to do, rather than learning things you may not need like rigging etc

    Well, like you said, it depends on what I wanna do and I'm still unsure where I'm standing when it comes to 3D.

    I don't even know whether I like it or not. 

    I don't think I'd wanna be only a 3D artist.

    The reason I want to start learning C4D is to kick my projects up a notch, not because the only thing I wanna do is 3D.

    I wanna learn to composite it.

    That's what I'm mainly focusing on, compositing, that's where my skills come into action.

    But nowadays it seems that the industry is full of compositors and companies/studios only look for great 3D artists.

    I can't imagine myself working in an office on specific objects without compositing them into real scenes.

    What should I do, man?

     

    @Cerbera

    Is C4D even enough if you want to apply as a 3D artists? Or do you need to know bunch of other softwares?

    Because many studios work with Maya, 3dsmax and bunch of other softwares.

    I'm just wondering, what happens when someone becomes a master in C4D and wants to apply to a studio where they don't work with C4D?

    It limits the search spectrum, right?

    22 hours ago, Beefdoctor said:

    Hello JustBegun, I make Cinema 4D tutorials, here's a link to my site

    Digitalmeat.uk

    There's plenty of video tutorials there dealing with a wide range of aspects of Cinema 4D.

     

    I also have a Patreon page in which i provide more in-depth tutorials such as "Hard Surface Modelling" and "XPresso"

     

     

    Here's some links to tutorials I've done on this subject

    Motion Tracker

    Projection Mapping

    Object Tracking Pt1

    Object Tracking Pt2

     

    Here's one on Global Illumination


    Global Illumination



     

    Hey man!! siiick tutorials :) 

    Watched 2 of them yesterday, gonna watch the rest today and throughout my upcoming weeks.

    I really appreciate it, your work is amazing and more people should know about it.

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    35 minutes ago, JustBegun said:

    Is C4D even enough if you want to apply as a 3D artists? Or do you need to know bunch of other softwares?

    If you are a master modeller in C4D (with about 10 years experience), then you will most likely also be able to model in pretty much any program, after an initial period where you learn all the specifics and methodologies of the new software. If you want maximum employability across all of 3D then you need to know what you are doing in Maya most principally, as that is the industry standard in a lot of areas, but particularly character work. But be aware that it is also considerably harder to work in than Cinema, so you should start getting the practice in now if that is your main goal. 

     

    CBR 

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    7 hours ago, JustBegun said:

    Hey man!! siiick tutorials :) 

    Watched 2 of them yesterday, gonna watch the rest today and throughout my upcoming weeks.

    I really appreciate it, your work is amazing and more people should know about it.

     

    Cool, I really hope it helps and gives you a good starting point. Also i agree, more people should know about my tutorials :lol:

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