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bobc4d

Just when I thought I was out . . . .

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  • Houdini has a really good UV tool, far better than C4D

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    On 5/10/2018 at 10:34 AM, Isleofgough said:

    3D coat is great, but for complex objects, a little manual work will give a MUCH better result. That definitely applies to 3D coat.

    Very true but I have had luck with filigree stuff like wrought iron. I wouldn't use it for anything that had to be animated.

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    Welcome back bobc4d.

     

    I am curious.  Are there no tools in the studio version of c4d that you kind of miss even with using Houdini?

     

    The most impressive UV unwrapping tool I've seen is Unfold3D.  With 3Dcoat I'd only use Unfold3D if I was doing a lot of UV unwrapping or needed something complex to have some compact and organized UVs unwrapped.

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  • On 5/19/2018 at 4:04 AM, Fastbee said:

    Welcome back bobc4d.

     

    I am curious.  Are there no tools in the studio version of c4d that you kind of miss even with using Houdini?

     

    The most impressive UV unwrapping tool I've seen is Unfold3D.  With 3Dcoat I'd only use Unfold3D if I was doing a lot of UV unwrapping or needed something complex to have some compact and organized UVs unwrapped.

    Houdini does everything Studio does that I used, mostly dynamics and voronoi, but it is not as intuitive and a lot more to do to get same result.  I am still playing with it

     

    edit: after sleep on it I did remember something Houdini does not have Studio does and is sorely needed, camera mapping.  it does not have a way to import an image and drop an object/model into it and make it look like it belongs there.

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    Ofcourse, I was ment bobc4d.

    Excuse Anthony, I was read this thread for few days, know it´s all about bobc4d and at the end wrote wrong name. Really don´t understand why...

    I thing I was looking for real name and yours stay in my mind...

    (I´m not as old as it could be by my age :) )

    :compFist:

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    Houdini doesn’t have sculpting. There is an awkward workaround that I doubt anyone uses. The retopo tool is not up to C4D polypen. NPR rendering is more complex to set up and not as powerful (unless you are willing to get into complicated shader builds). Lots of things require extra non intuitive nodes to correct the lack of built in options (like uV mapping of sweeps). There are few procedural surface textures built in, so you will end up doing a lot of work to get what C4D offers out of the box. You need a lot more organizational skills to be able to find where things are done. The viewport will generally not display procedural textures, unlike C4D. Substance shaders are better incorporated in C4D (you really can't change reflection or specular in Houdini with these). There are other downsides, but the power is amazing.

     

    Hard surface modeling is about as easy as C4D and has the advantage that it is much easier to go back and change decisions about edits, with everything propagating forward. You also have a sort of built in xpresso in modeling that is very useful for making sure things are at exact positions relative to other objects (copy parameter, paste relative reference). Those alone make the overall modeling experience a bit faster in Houdini. For mograph type work, there is no comparison. Houdini is much more powerful. Houdini also has the ability to create an infinite number of attributes for points and polygons and these can be used to drive color, position, etc. There is really no such alternative in C4D. If one wants to add fluids, smoke, etc., it is there in Houdini and absent in C4D. However, be prepared to learn VEX and hscript commands, as they are necessary if you plan to do more than the most basic things in Houdini. Even setting up materials can be very complex if one wants to use more than the basic principled shader. For instance, C4D allows one to add a fresnel shader to color, luminosity, etc. In Houdini, you will have to set up some complicated nodes in the material editor.

     

    For me, the difference between Houdini and C4D is like working in Visual C++ vs Visual Basic. There is much more power in Houdini but at the expense of not having built in features that someone did behind the scene to make everything easier.

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    Just wanted to post about this new set of tools which IMHO makes Houdini a lot more palatable to C4D users who are used to pulling up easy-to-configure MoGraph effectors and unavoidably end up being quite disappointed when they discover that Houdini makes even something as simple as cloning a bunch of cubes on a grid and randomizing their position a big challenge. It's weird in a way how ridiculously easy it can be to set up a complex fluid simulation, but simply creating a fall-off which affects size or random distribution can be a nightmare for anyone not well versed in VEX coding.

     

    Well…no more! Last night MOPS was released by two really brilliant guys and I do think it should instantly make Houdini a lot more familiar to many of us. Check out some of the videos, you'll recognize a lot of familiar things from C4D, except within the Houdini nodal context. Pretty cool stuff for people interested in being able to work on both platforms.

     

    https://www.motionoperators.com

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    This is a step in the right direction. What you get is several Pre-Built networks of nodes with intuitive parameters to the network. You never need to edit the contents and can use it to set up clones. However, unlike C4D’s mograph, you can go in and tweak the nodes in the network to add features not in the digital asset. Since one of the big criticisms of Houdini is that a lot of nodes and setups are not intuitive, this digital asset allows you to learn how such setups are made.

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  • VaroMix came up with a polygon pen tool in Houdini,  start with a grid add a topobuild then attach grid to righthand input on topobuild.

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