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daddycoull

Weighting Clothes

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Hi there,

 

So I created 'Clothes' for my character (see attachment) these just sit over the character model I created.  What's the right way to approach weighting these?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-30 at 08.46.00.png

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In most cases the answer here is 'delete all the parts of the body mesh that are covered by clothes'. That will eliminate a whole ton of weighting problems you will encounter if you try and leave the body underneath the clothes intact.

 

CBR

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like cerbera said, delete the body mesh underneath. no reason to keep it unless you're planning on having your character perform a striptease and rip his clothes off ;)

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  • Ah I see, that makes good sense! Thanks for the replies :)

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    When you design a character in the future make sure you know at the design stage if he will need a change of clothes or not.  If not then you only need a basic proxy body underneath while modelling your clothes which will help you keep your designs volume, scale, limb length, and volume to he design while making the clothes.  If you look in your C4D assets your see some good examples of what the guys have said about not using the body with clothes on top.  Only time id keep the body or model him naked is if the clothes where to change and I was using dynamic clothing made within Marvellous Designer.

     

    Dan

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  • Now that I've deleted the body areas that were hidden by the clothing, is it best practice to make the parts all one mesh? or to leave the pieces separate? (see attached)

    Screen Shot 2018-05-30 at 09.46.30.png

    Screen Shot 2018-05-30 at 09.46.44.png

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    Technically you could do either, but I vote 'All one mesh except the glasses, although if they stay put for the entire animation then even those could be included. Typically I find it is quicker to work with a single character object than it is to work with lots of disparate parts all weighted to the same joints.

     

    CBR

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  • 1 minute ago, Cerbera said:

    Technically you could do either, but I vote 'All one mesh except the glasses' I would have thought, although if they stay put for the animation then even those could be included in the single mesh...

     

    CBR

    Ok cool I'll do that then, I've multiple copies, so I don't lose anything from making it all one mesh to try this out.

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    Oops. Meant to say glasses and EYES ! Eyes should be separate if they move, which I assume they will !

     

    CBR

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  • 12 minutes ago, Cerbera said:

    Oops. Meant to say glasses and EYES ! Eyes should be separate if they move, which I assume they will !

     

    CBR

    Yeah my eyes are separate I watched a tut that showed me how to make them follow the head, without actually making them part of the mesh.

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    One thing I have been doing is making a polygon selection tag for each piece of clothing, like the pants, shirt, tie as well as hands, head, feet. that way I can hide everything else while weighting and be more precise and see problems easier. Especially since I often add bones to a tie. 

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  • 2 minutes ago, CApruzzese said:

    One thing I have been doing is making a polygon selection tag for each piece of clothing, like the pants, shirt, tie as well as hands, head, feet. that way I can hide everything else while weighting and be more precise and see problems easier. Especially since I often add bones to a tie. 

    Thanks for that tip, sounds quite interesting!

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