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mdouglas

Depth of field with Isometric camera?

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Hi there, I've created a Minecraft-style animation with an Isometric camera and was hoping to add depth of field to it. I always struggle with DOF and can't seem to get any results at all. Does Cinema even let you use DOF with an Isometric camera?  Given that the Isometric camera is a bit odd I'm wondering if it does - I've moved the camera around and if you check out the attached screenshot, it currently doesn't even have my models in front of it (check out the Right viewport). I can also bury the camera right in the middle of the geo and get basically the same view, so I'm wondering if the camera's positioning even matters?

 

I've enabled Physical render and turned on DOF in the render settings. I adjusted the focus distance and even tried using a Focus Object, I also turned on DOF Map Front and Rear Blurs and played with those settings. I also tried a Depth pass render which just turned out white. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated! Cheers.

Screen Shot 2018-07-04 at 12.07.22 PM.png

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I never thought about this with isometric, don't get anything to work.

 

But, you can add a Position Pass (and a Post Effect for the  Multipass) if you set the space to Camera and make the Scale very low, you can use something like Frischluft Depth Of Field inside After effects. Dunno if you know this...

 

 

 

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  • 33 minutes ago, westbam said:

    I never thought about this with isometric, don't get anything to work.

     

    But, you can add a Position Pass (and a Post Effect for the  Multipass) if you set the space to Camera and make the Scale very low, you can use something like Frischluft Depth Of Field inside After effects. Dunno if you know this...

     

     

    @westbam - thanks! I'd forgotten about the Position Pass. That does seem to give me what I'll need. Cheers!

     

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    You can also use a camera with a veeery high Focal Length. At some point it's basically the same as an isometric camera. All you need is the same angle. I like doing this more than the isometric camera as it's more flexible.

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