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Hard shape to achieve in SDS


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Hopefully one of the many Subdivision gods here can help me with this. I am revisiting an old project and am having the hardest time recreating something I did using a boolean. Can anyone give me some topology tips on how to achieve this?

 

image.thumb.png.9c23ae1142439e4694034dcdaa38beeb.png

 

This is an oldie of mine that I managed to create using a boolean; I am trying to do this with SDS modelling now. I included the scene file in case anyone wanted to look at it for whatever reason.

Untitled 7.c4d

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a bit trickier than i initially thought... tried it first with less segments, but that didn't work out, there was always some visible pinching in the transition. you need to fiddle around a bit with the point distribution in the beveled area where the hexagonal shape begins to get a smooth transition.

Screen Shot 2018-07-21 at 10.21.39 copy.jpg

Screen Shot 2018-07-21 at 10.21.27 copy.jpg

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Everfresh is on the right track there, shapes like this can be tricky, when they transition from an object with a sharp edge, to a smooth surface, the main problem being preservation of the curvature, i had a quick attempt heres, a slightly lower poly version

 

thing test.c4d

 

9f43c3fe056706851a45122525a2f036.png

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I think the two examples above have too much geometry. One of the points of SDS modelling, apart from the fact that it can do all the weird shapes, is that you can get those shapes while keeping your poly count low.

 

Try this...

 

5b53317dc2eeb_SDSExample.thumb.jpg.844ac0eb59195d267b7af523ff3702cc.jpg

 

SDS Example.c4d

 

Hopefully, Cerbera will pop along at some point. He's an SDS geek (in the best possible sense ::):) so he'll probably have something valuable to add to the conversation.

 

By the way, your original attempt is nice and clean so, unless you were on a mission to keep your polys low (big complicated scene, long render times, for instance), I see nothing wrong with doing it that way.

 

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1 hour ago, StCanas said:

I think the two examples above have too much geometry. One of the points of SDS modelling, apart from the fact that it can do all the weird shapes, is that you can get those shapes while keeping your poly count low.

 

Try this...

 

5b53317dc2eeb_SDSExample.thumb.jpg.844ac0eb59195d267b7af523ff3702cc.jpg

 

SDS Example.c4d

 

Hopefully, Cerbera will pop along at some point. He's an SDS geek (in the best possible sense ::):) so he'll probably have something valuable to add to the conversation.

 

By the way, your original attempt is nice and clean so, unless you were on a mission to keep your polys low (big complicated scene, long render times, for instance), I see nothing wrong with doing it that way.

 

One of the advantages of SDS modelling is indeed, being able to model many shapes with a lower poly count. This especially applies to more organic shapes as you need less polys to achieve curved surfaces, that being said just because it's SDS doesn't mean that it's always going to be low poly

 

In some circumstances it's just not possible to achieve the desired results without adding more geometry, this especially applies to objects like this, with a transition to a curved surface, too low poly and the control loops will cause hard edges breaking the smooth curvature of the object.

 

The example you posted is FULL of unnecessary ngons which I would consider modelling mistakes, might aswell throw some triangles in there too, to top it off ! without going into the whole ngons don't matter if it renders fine argument, (they do) it's just not a good example of modelling etiquette to provide to someone who's trying to improve their modelling skills.

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Sorry guys - been away for a few days. Would have chipped in sooner had I seen this earlier...

 

2 hours ago, VECTOR said:

t's just not a good example of modelling etiquette to provide to someone who's trying to improve their modelling skills.

I'd have to agree with that. Ngons like that ARE modelling mistakes, end of, and you should be embarrassed to hand over any model that contains them to a client ;) Were you to do that, you're effectively saying 'Hey look, I am unaware of, or have chosen to ignore the basic rules of SDS modelling !' :)

 

I'd also have to say, 'too many polys for what' ?! Vector's model contains precisely the correct amount of polygons to model this well, and the amount in Everfresh's is hardly problematic... And in this day and age, and in OPs application, which is learning to SDS model, polycount is all but irrelevant anyway, except in a game engine context where SDS doesn't generally apply ! I would prefer it if people didn't demonstrate technically bad ways of doing things for people who are trying to learn the right way, but what can ya do, other than advise OP to listen to Vector and Everfresh !! ;) Sorry SC - I just can't concur that what you're doing there is a good idea :)

 

CBR

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9 hours ago, everfresh said:

a bit trickier than i initially thought... tried it first with less segments, but that didn't work out, there was always some visible pinching in the transition. you need to fiddle around a bit with the point distribution in the beveled area where the hexagonal shape begins to get a smooth transition.

8 hours ago, VECTOR said:

Everfresh is on the right track there, shapes like this can be tricky, when they transition from an object with a sharp edge, to a smooth surface, the main problem being preservation of the curvature, i had a quick attempt heres, a slightly lower poly version

 

4 hours ago, StCanas said:

I think the two examples above have too much geometry. One of the points of SDS modelling, apart from the fact that it can do all the weird shapes, is that you can get those shapes while keeping your poly count low.

Try this...

 

This is amazing. Thank you everyone that took the time to respond and help me with this.

 

So I think I am starting to get the hang of it, there are some some minor errors that I need to work out, but I am figuring it out as I go. Now, I'd like to ask, what is the process for you guys on this? I know everyone tends to have a different way of doing things, i'd just like to know all the options available to me. For example, one of the two scene files (Vector's), it looks like one was a cylinder that (I think?) was joined with something else and then worked on from there? It's hard to tell. I'm not very good at looking at someones mesh and being able to figure out their workflow. For mine I had a cylinder at 24 faces and another at 6, then basically joined them and worked from there. I worked on only one side and Arrayed it six times.


 This here is my attempt. Mine is the left-most one. I was using Vector's as a reference.

image.thumb.png.79e01458d73d02b7744d461882a80692.pngimage.thumb.png.65fdf2f9af228cb2f5bc8009c66bc72e.png

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Here's my effort doing it with the minimum number of polygons that you can achieve the shape with. I'm using edge weighting. If you wanted a slight bevel to the edges then you could either fake it with a bevel edge shader, physically bevel the edges, or crank up the sub-vision some more then mess around with edge weighting. Scene file attached.

 

hex.png

 

Scene file:

 

Hex.zip

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1 hour ago, Onilgob said:

 

 

This is amazing. Thank you everyone that took the time to respond and help me with this.

 

So I think I am starting to get the hang of it, there are some some minor errors that I need to work out, but I am figuring it out as I go. Now, I'd like to ask, what is the process for you guys on this? I know everyone tends to have a different way of doing things, i'd just like to know all the options available to me. For example, one of the two scene files (Vector's), it looks like one was a cylinder that (I think?) was joined with something else and then worked on from there? It's hard to tell. I'm not very good at looking at someones mesh and being able to figure out their workflow. For mine I had a cylinder at 24 faces and another at 6, then basically joined them and worked from there. I worked on only one side and Arrayed it six times.


 This here is my attempt. Mine is the left-most one. I was using Vector's as a reference.

image.thumb.png.79e01458d73d02b7744d461882a80692.pngimage.thumb.png.65fdf2f9af228cb2f5bc8009c66bc72e.png

 

There's a few ways you could go about this, working in an array or with symmetry  is a good approach as you literally only have to model the bare minimum.

 

i just quickly dropped a cylinder into the scene, gave it 6 rotational segments, cut the cap off the end where it's going to attach, and dissolved a couple of edges on the rear cap so you're left with one horizontal cut in the middle

 

84f594bcd9e99393f31c0533de25d970.png

 

e689aa60f7013a126ea777e3077bde02.png

 

I then did a few loop cuts to add the extra edges needed to connect to the second cylinder later

 

b08b07f746645c612467aaf8c8e4c5e5.png

 

i then just selected some points and moved them to give the desired curve

 

94470ba65d6f47ea4463b722966df9e5.png

 

i then  grabbed a second cylinder, gave it 24 segments and scaled it slightly smaller, selected both meshes 

and did a connect object and delete command, then loop selected the edges on both connecting parts, 

in either point or edge mode, using the stitch and sow tool holding shift and dragging a point across

to bridge the gap between the two with poly's . 

 

Then just  select all points and run an optimise command, you might also need to do an align normals also

as sometimes that bridged section can have the normals reversed 

 

ea7a2fc527b2341808518a4b7a11fb69.png

 

af6be348a547c66836c0d10b07c53e87.png

 

7898c1354277190c2e2c8e5a990de127.png

 

then it's just a matter of adding in a few control loops to tighten up the edges like so 

 

855519f1ae732fe4949756a2cae1599a.png

 

 

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