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  • 33 minutes ago, maliohammad said:

    3D modeling isn't a fast process that you can do in a few clicks. A proper model with nice topology will require a lot of time and patience to do, but once you master the basics of all quad modeling you should be able to make such objects in a few minutes (such a teapot is so simple to make)

    I know but I was wishing to find some shortcut solutions....what would I do in the future when I design a complex object and I only want to fuse a small piece to it?! shall I remodel the whole thing and waste more time?! have we always rebuild the whole topology just to amend small things? I am talking about tight times, deadlines and you have to figure a fast solution and not to lose what you already built! 

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    13 minutes ago, Smashkhaledo said:

    I know but I was wishing to find some shortcut solutions....what would I do in the future when I design a complex object and I only want to fuse a small piece to it?! shall I remodel the whole thing and waste more time?! have we always rebuild the whole topology just to amend small things? I am talking about tight times, deadlines and you have to figure a fast solution and not to lose what you already built! 

    If you have a decent modeling skills you won't need to remodel the whole object. In most cases you can just add ass many objects with the proper joints. 

    When I started modeling I had to memorize all the numbers of edge loops to get a perfect connection (Hint: it was useless). 

    If you learn the SDS modeling concepts you can do a lot of things, and really fast. 

    Something to help you understand this is "upscaling" and "downscaling", you will use them way too often (connecting low to high points and vice versa)

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    Bit slow here at work, so I took a stab at doing this manually with the given geometry of the pot. 

     

    Since the spout sweep was still available, I matched the spline subdivs to be the needed number of rotations to fit. I split a selection of polys from the pot that would give me the necessary points to manipulate, and that would seamlessly connect back to the pot later. The trick here is to change the edge flow direction in order to extrude the spout. This is done by creating the highlighted polys in the first image. Then I used the slide tool to push points along edges to maintain the curvature of the sphere/pot while shaping the base of the spout, using the sweep object as a guide. Image 2 show the finalized version. It's not the best job, I know!

     

    Next, I removed the patch of polys from the original pot and connected and optimized the new piece to weld them together. For the spout, I extruded the new oval edge loop out a small bit for the base portion, then again all the way to the tip. Scaled it to match the tip. From here it was just a matter of introducing cuts along the length and moving/rotating/scaling into position to mostly match the sweep, which was setup to have similar subdivisions as the pot (sorry I didn't take any screens at this point). Modeling Axis, Loop select, Edge snap, and the Scale tool were used a lot on this bit.

     

    You can get this shape utilizing a lot fewer polys with SDS modeling from the beginning. Again, this isn't perfect, but it was good practice to 'save' a model. :) 

     

    Seaching the net for things like 'topology curve to circle' or similar can often reveal a lot of information. Good luck and keep modeling!

     

    teapot-fix.thumb.jpg.f7f2a30c662eecfc7075d71c40320271.jpg

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  • On 8/1/2018 at 2:43 AM, Vizn said:

    Bit slow here at work, so I took a stab at doing this manually with the given geometry of the pot. 

     

    Since the spout sweep was still available, I matched the spline subdivs to be the needed number of rotations to fit. I split a selection of polys from the pot that would give me the necessary points to manipulate, and that would seamlessly connect back to the pot later. The trick here is to change the edge flow direction in order to extrude the spout. This is done by creating the highlighted polys in the first image. Then I used the slide tool to push points along edges to maintain the curvature of the sphere/pot while shaping the base of the spout, using the sweep object as a guide. Image 2 show the finalized version. It's not the best job, I know!

     

    Next, I removed the patch of polys from the original pot and connected and optimized the new piece to weld them together. For the spout, I extruded the new oval edge loop out a small bit for the base portion, then again all the way to the tip. Scaled it to match the tip. From here it was just a matter of introducing cuts along the length and moving/rotating/scaling into position to mostly match the sweep, which was setup to have similar subdivisions as the pot (sorry I didn't take any screens at this point). Modeling Axis, Loop select, Edge snap, and the Scale tool were used a lot on this bit.

     

    You can get this shape utilizing a lot fewer polys with SDS modeling from the beginning. Again, this isn't perfect, but it was good practice to 'save' a model. :) 

     

    Seaching the net for things like 'topology curve to circle' or similar can often reveal a lot of information. Good luck and keep modeling!

     

    teapot-fix.thumb.jpg.f7f2a30c662eecfc7075d71c40320271.jpg

    I already done something similar to this, I used boole to merge the spout I made with the body sphere using the method A union B, then i deleted the spout but kept the circle hole on the body, from there I cloned the lines and moved and scaled them one by one and used my old spout as a reference! 
    later I practiced on SDS modeling using few polygons and subdivision to make a milk pot and it worked like a charm!

    Screen Shot 2018-08-03 at 15,09,56.png

    Screen Shot 2018-08-03 at 15,10,15.png

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