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Substance Painter Summer release

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With the excitement I see for many with R20 this may not get as much attention but here is nice update for Substance Painter.  Looks like another step closer to Mari with its new projection options.

https://www.allegorithmic.com/blog/substance-painter-summer-2018  

 

Quoted from the link above:

 

Realtime SSS from Iray

We see plenty of amazing characters created in Substance Painter every month and we’ve had a lot of requests for being able to actually experience realistic skin rendering while working on those, and even being able to output high-quality character renders right out of Iray without leaving the tool! 

The standard shaders in Substance Painter now support full sub-surface scattering by default. Simply add a Scattering map to your texture set and activate the SSS effect in the post-effects settings to improve the rendering of skin, organic surfaces and even wax or jade. The SSS used in the real time viewport is based on state-of-the-art research from Pixar, and will automatically translate to Iray. 

 

Projection and Fill improvements

The projection and fill tools are getting a makeover with added control and options. 

Non-square projection
This one was overdue, you can now load arbitrary sized image in both the Projection and Stencil tool, their ratio and resolution will stay intact. 

Projection Tiling options
The Projection and Stencil tools now have an option to disable their tiling in either one or both axes. 

 

Fill Transformation Manipulators Fill layers can now be manipulated directly in the viewport using transformation gizmos called manipulators. Standard UV Projection fill layers feature a 2D manipulator in the UV viewport while Triplanar Projection fills get a full 3D manipulator in the 3D viewport allowing to translate, scale and rotate the projection precisely directly in the scene. A new contextual toolbar is also available on top of the viewport to customize things such as the manipulator display size and other useful shortcuts. 

 

Camera Import and Selection

Cameras can now be imported alongside the mesh. If your file contains multiple cameras, their settings will be kept intact and you will be able to easily switch from camera to camera in the viewport. A new option also allows you to preview the frame of the camera depending on its ratio as an overlay in the 3D viewport. 

 

Drag and Drop on ID Map

Materials and Smart Materials can now be drag and dropped on ID colors directly. Hold Ctrl (or Cmd on Mac) while dragging your material onto the viewport to display the ID colors, an ID mask will be created automatically in your stack when you drop the asset. 

 

Alembic Support

A common request from animation and visual effects customers, the Alembic file format is now supported. We currently import mesh and camera data at time 0. 

 

Full glTF support

glTF support has been improved and Substance Painter will now import and apply the textures automatically when loading in a glTF mesh. This allows bringing in meshes downloaded from our friends at Sketchfab without being bothered with importing and figuring out where textures should go. 

 

Improved Substance Format Support

Visible-if statements and embedded presets are now supported in Substance Painter, making it easier to find just the right settings when tweaking Substance materials and effects. 

 

 

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I haven't use Substance Painter in a while. Looking forward to continue with a project I put on the shelf a while ago.

In the past I had created this utility plugin, which allowed me to import the generated Substance Painter textures into Cinema 4D in a more automated way.

 

https://www.c4dcafe.com/ipb/forums/topic/92673-speti-and-tina

 

I am still looking for a way to provide access to all my (non-commercial) plugins, without requiring a specific website, nor the C4DCafe Store ... but that's food for another story.

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Can anyone clue me in on the workflow from C4D to Substance Painter and back again? It's something that must seem so obvious to pros that they dont bother to mention it. I have seen some people mention unwrapping in C4D first, others seem to apply basic materials in C4D then export directly to SP.

 

If I wanted to texture the lantern they have in their recent demo video, and I had modelled it in C4D, how would I round trip it out to Substance Painter?

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  • 3 minutes ago, Freemorpheme said:

    Can anyone clue me in on the workflow from C4D to Substance Painter and back again? It's something that must seem so obvious to pros that they dont bother to mention it. I have seen some people mention unwrapping in C4D first, others seem to apply basic materials in C4D then export directly to SP.

     

    If I wanted to texture the lantern they have in their recent demo video, and I had modelled it in C4D, how would I round trip it out to Substance Painter?

    Unfortunately depending on which way you look at it C4D works with Substances only, exported from Substance Designer while Substance painter does not export substances but the baked textures.  To work with C4D you just need to know what textures are needed to produce the same effect.  In either case Unwrapping is needed, and it should be done on a 1:1 ratio between the actually model and UV islands as giving more texture space to one island over another will cause issues where there is seams such as the quality differences due to more or less texture space.

     

    Now while I work in C4D I dont use its native render engine, I use Vray in which its rather simple to use Substance painter materials.  When I looked into C4D material system it seemed there was some issues as to where you put certain maps.  I dont have any files on this pc to refer to right now.  type Substance painter to C4D on youtube and there is a chair tutorial which looks to be working fine.

     

    Dan

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    Thanks Dan, I must say I'm still scratching my head. Can you tell me what a Substance is? 

     

    I think since Reflectance it's much easier to import maps from other programs as they all find a place somewhere in the stack, but this is based on my experience bringing textures in from 3DS Max. 

     

    When you say '1:1 ratio between the actual model and UV islands' do you mean to make the UVs all a comparable size to get the same detail? 

     

    And am I right in thinking I can model something in C4D, unwrap it, send the mesh to SP, texture it, export baked texture maps which I can then apply to my model back in C4D? 

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  • 51 minutes ago, Freemorpheme said:

    Thanks Dan, I must say I'm still scratching my head. Can you tell me what a Substance is? 

     

    I think since Reflectance it's much easier to import maps from other programs as they all find a place somewhere in the stack, but this is based on my experience bringing textures in from 3DS Max. 

     

    When you say '1:1 ratio between the actual model and UV islands' do you mean to make the UVs all a comparable size to get the same detail? 

     

    And am I right in thinking I can model something in C4D, unwrap it, send the mesh to SP, texture it, export baked texture maps which I can then apply to my model back in C4D? 

    In simple terms a Substance is made within Substance designer in which can get rather complex by making a procedural material that gives the user who uses a substance file access to many of its parameters.  From a substance material which C4D supports your have access to tons of parameters that let you tweak it to perfection.  Substance Painter also uses substances and allows you to paint these directly onto the surface of the 3d object, or fill a uv island, or material ID.  Substance painter has effects/filters that allow you to stack substances on top of each other in a way that would be almost impossible or very very time consuming in the traditional way say in Photoshop as you need real time feedback on how its going to look before you commit what you see baked down to texture maps.  Because its painting reflection, colour, bump, normal, glossiness, to mention a few the final look can be seen real time so your know how it will look in any render app that supports PBR (physicaly base rendering)  If your app does support PBR the results with be identical.

     

    When you split your model up during Uv mapping you may have the head separate from the body, and the arms.  Each separate part is a UV Island.  When you fit all UV islands into a single UV space you often have the choice to fit each island to either the scale of each island that should be in relation to the actual 3D model, and to other Uv islands, or to randomly fit the islands into the UV space for best fit so some islands may get more uv space than others   You may choose to have the head island use more space than the body.  When you paint across seams the Uv islands are respected according to their scale and orientation and this can cause issues between one uv island and another on the texture map.  The head could have nice skin pores but the neck could look significantly low res in comparison.  This then makes you use a 1:1 scale ratio between islands, not to be confused with 1:1 uv space as this is more to do with UDIM workflows.  The issue with using a 1:1 island scale ratio is you need to have much bigger maps in order to get the high end detail, substance lets you bake at 8k which is not too bad at all, but UDIMs is where the power is for ultra high end maps.

     

    Yes you got the concept correct.  You model, uv map, export that to substance painter and paint it.  When you generate the texture maps these are a combination of colour and control maps for reflectance and glossy along with bump, normal and displacement maps that align and work perfectly with each other to produce the exact same result you see in Substance painter.  Substance files can also be loaded into C4D but they cant be painted onto the model and baked but remain procedural and is applied on a surface basis only.  Substance painter gives you significantly more control in which you can come up with your own unique textures which can be painted on any part of the surface and blended.  You have alphas, filters, effects, dirt maps that use substance painters own advanced methods of finding the depth of the surface.  You have buttons, shapes, and mechanical normal map stamps that can be placed anywhere on the model using as many layers as your wish which at the end of it all gets baked into a single Normal map.  Iv barely got into Substance painter but found on my first project creating leather and stitching for my last works in was super easy and the results where great.

     

    Dan

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  • 1 hour ago, C4DS said:

    I haven't use Substance Painter in a while. Looking forward to continue with a project I put on the shelf a while ago.

    In the past I had created this utility plugin, which allowed me to import the generated Substance Painter textures into Cinema 4D in a more automated way.

     

    https://www.c4dcafe.com/ipb/forums/topic/92673-speti-and-tina

     

    I am still looking for a way to provide access to all my (non-commercial) plugins, without requiring a specific website, nor the C4DCafe Store ... but that's food for another story.

    That looks like a very good solution to importing textures.  I hope many appreciate your efforts on this, and other plugs/scripts you have produced.

     

    Dan

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    I've been using Substance Designer and Substance Painter for painting and texturing.

     

    Substance designer is a node based program to create scalable materials/textures with diffuse, ambient occlusion, metalic, reflectivity, bump, displacement, normal, and other channels. However, if you don't have Substance designer, there are loads of high quality substances already built that you can download that you can use for painting.

     

    Substance painter allows you to use these to "paint" onto a surface. Unlike 3D coat, it is much easier to use if you have multiple different objects and want to texture these seperately but see how they look together. As Dan said, you can blend/mask the different substances in the painting.

     

    If you want to avoid some problems, do not use the substance plugins for C4D or Houdini. These only bring in substance designer substances and can be problematic. I export a fbx from whatever DCC I am using and do all the painting in Substance Painter and bake these textures. Then back in the DCC, you create materials and assign the textures onto the material. Assuming you did good UV mapping prior to exporting the fbx, everything works well.

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    Almost forgot I once made a short video demonstrating the workflow I used.

    The workflow heavily relies on the plugins I created, but things can be done without those (obviously with more manual work).

     

     

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    Oh how sweet is that! I was thinking on getting marmoset toolbag 3 for nice Realtime renders but I think I'll just do an upgrade to the new SP version. Thanks for the heads up Dan

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