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Fix deformations on knee

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As you can see from the attachment, the knee is badly deformed when is animated.

 

How can I control the crease on the knee better so it would seem more natural?

tubo 2.4.5.c4d

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Hi

 

From the file I am concluding that you are quite new to rigging and I would recommend you to do some basic tutorials on rigging.

With that being said, quick and dirty fix is to smooth the weights of two joints that are influencing knee area. So, shift double click on weight tag, select both joints and set the mode to smooth and apply a few times. Again, rigging is a skill and takes some effort to master, yet, rigging simple characters is easy as long as you are willing to spend just a few hours watching tutorials ;)

 

Cheers


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No much to add to whats been said but its also good to understand the requirements of the model to animate well.   A model can have too many polygons, too few, edge loops need to be in the right places such as elbows, knees e.c.t.  Also as part of the rigging process is placing the joints in the right locations, this may be obvious but it can make a huge difference when it comes to the shoulders, knees, and elbows.  As a last resort you have PSD morphs that aid it correcting the deformations to get them even better where weighting has been used to the best it can do.

 

http://wiki.polycount.com/wiki/Limb_Topology

 

Dan

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  • Topic Author
  • Thank you @HSrdelic and @Rectro.

     

    I would like to get straight into animation, but I feel that rigging is more important than setting keyframes.

     

    I think it is also more difficult for a newbie to learn rigging than modelling, animation or rendering because rigging effects are not seen straight away.

    With modelling you are doing a bevel, you can see the effect straight away.

    With animation you set a few keyframes, effect is seen straight away.

    With rendering you play around with a few lights or materials, and depending on the machine, effects can be seen straight away.

    But with rigging, the changes on weight painting, joints placement or polygons deformations cannot be seen straight away, unless you animate.

     

    Rigging requires more intuition and experience. You might realise in the middle of animation that the character does not deform the way you wanted so you need to work on it again. With rigging you are always supposed to think ahead for making the character flexible, but not overfill it with controls.

     

    Anyway, I have fiddled with Weight Painting and Morph tag and everything seems to be better for now.

     

    Screen Shot 2018-08-08 at 09.10.26.png

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    When you rig you do need to have some modelling skills and/or requirements of the target use.  Im not a rigger out n out, but iv had to learn to rig to a certain point, things can get rather technical down the line.  When you rig you dont have to wait for a nasty surprise down the line, you push the rig through its paces before you start doing animation.  One quick way is to download the skinning Mocap file from Mixamo.  This puts the rig into extreme poses.  If your not going to use that then you set a key for the controllers at frame 0 move forward to another frame and pose say the arms to extreme positions that the rig is likly to be put through, do the same for torso twisting, neck, upper and lower legs and arms.  Once you have these keys set you forward to these keys and weight paint areas that are bad, make sure you have (Deform Editing) on within the viewport settings otherwise when you go int any component mode such as edges, verts or faces the keyed pose wont stay in place, its also of use to select edges then the the keys (U+Y) or (U+K) to grow or shrink the selection then apply weighting or smoothing from the weight manager.

     

    Looking at the image above its very dense, I assume this has a SDS tag on it?  With a SDS tag on you wont see the weighting, best to get the deformation good at the base cage level.  Rigging requires that you have a ideal model to start with, and a direction as to what the rigged model has to perform.  The rig is made for the animator ease of use, even if you are that animator thing how easy and flexible it would be for someone else to use.  Get the name convention right, dont skip on this.  This means you must have decided a prefix or post fix, and a name convention to understand what are controllers.  Not only will the name convention be easy to understand but it aids in symmetry later on.  

     

    Animation itself is yet another skill of its own, these skill sets will take many years not to discourage you, but its good to find out where your interest are and see what skill sets you need to focus on.  If your going to be a generalist learn to model first.

     

    Dan

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    it looks like the weight distribution of your knee is still not optimal. the very middle edge loop, right where your knee joint is at needs to be weighted 50/50 to thigh and shin. the loops above and beneath could be weighted something like 90/10 or something like that (always depends on the specific situation, how close these loops are together and such)... you can also use additional joints which are driven by the rotations of the thigh and shin joints to fine tune that deformation. 

    the possibilities in rigging are endless and there's always multiple ways to skin a cat. ;)

     

     

     

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    Quote

    Once you have these keys set you forward to these keys and weight paint areas that are bad, make sure you have (Deform Editing) on within the viewport settings otherwise when you go int any component mode such as edges, verts or faces the keyed pose wont stay in place

     

    That's a little gem I never knew about thanks Rectro!

     

    Tubo as for your model it looks way too heavy on the poly front. Here is a grab of a pair of trousers showing less polys and nice deformations around the knee. Notice how the trousers are modeled. One thing you should learn when modeling is to model with animation in mind - think how something will deform and where to put edge loops. This is one of the problems I find when people do models in Zbrush and then export them - all the polys are reasonably even and not much use to riggers or animators.

     

    Trouser Topology.jpg

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    43 minutes ago, GaryAbrehart said:

    Oh! I thought it was one of those meshes that I sometimes get which is overkill on polys from another app. How did you know it Isoparms weren't switched on?

     

    there's a file attached to his first post. ;)

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