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nandthepand

Rainbow refractions?

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Hey,

 

im fairly new to this kind of area of cinema 4d.

 

does anyone have any idea how to create similar rainbow like refractions to the ones attached? Is it all based on the material and lighting combination, or is a plugin/ additional renderer at play here? If anyone has any tutorials, guides or resources to get me on my way to creating these I’d appreciate it! I’m on a Mac so don’t have access to octane :(

 

hope you can help ! :)

 

 

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the physical correct keyword is called chromatic aberration, often referred as CA in photography and film. you can do that with cinema if you have the physical renderer, i am not sure to which extent the rainbow color will come out but just experiment.

 

of course you need something behind which will refract, for example lines, letters anything dark on bright or bright on dark, it works either way and some transparent object in front a sphere for example -> create a material with transparency, set the refractive index to anything above or below  1,  i recommend 1.3 - 1.4 to start with. then go to render settings and set the renderer to physical. activate depth of field, set the sampling to low for now, later to high for less grainy out come of course. now create a camera, under the object tab set the sphere as focus object, under the physical tab take a low F-Stop maybe start with 1 (higher f stops will diminish this effect again) and set the chromatic aberration to 500 %. that should get you started.

 

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  • 3 hours ago, RichardZ said:

    the physical correct keyword is called  chromatic aberration, often referred as CA in photography and film. you can do that with cinema if you have the physical renderer, i am not sure to which extent the rainbow color will come out but just experiment.

     

    of course you need something behind which will refract, for example lines, letters anything dark on bright or bright on dark, it works either way and some transparent object in front a sphere for example -> create a material with transparency, set the refractive index to anything above or below  1,  i recommend 1.3 - 1.4 to start with. then go to render settings and set the renderer to physical. activate depth of field, set the sampling to low for now, later to high for less grainy out come of course. now create a camera, under the object tab set the sphere as focus object, under the physical tab take a low F-Stop maybe start with 1 (higher f stops will diminish this effect again) and set the chromatic aberration to 500 %. that should get you started.

     

     

    thanks so much, will have a playground and get back to you!

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  • 3 hours ago, RichardZ said:

    the physical correct keyword is called  chromatic aberration, often referred as CA in photography and film. you can do that with cinema if you have the physical renderer, i am not sure to which extent the rainbow color will come out but just experiment.

     

    of course you need something behind which will refract, for example lines, letters anything dark on bright or bright on dark, it works either way and some transparent object in front a sphere for example -> create a material with transparency, set the refractive index to anything above or below  1,  i recommend 1.3 - 1.4 to start with. then go to render settings and set the renderer to physical. activate depth of field, set the sampling to low for now, later to high for less grainy out come of course. now create a camera, under the object tab set the sphere as focus object, under the physical tab take a low F-Stop maybe start with 1 (higher f stops will diminish this effect again) and set the chromatic aberration to 500 %. that should get you started.

     

     

    Followed your directions exactly and this was my initial outcome! will continue to experiment. 

    Screenshot 2018-11-03 at 20.04.01.png

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  • An interesting second test incorporating much better lighting and global illumination. Any advice on how to advance to that more rainbow look? 1544872428_Screenshot2018-11-03at20_18_38.thumb.jpg.dfd20300c794c29f200374df4f8aafe9.jpg

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    after having a deep look myself i must say i am at the end of my latin with cinema on board systems only. from here on either somebody with a bigger brain could recompose the functions of cinema for this purpose or you need a different renderer. cinema seems to only fake the most common CA, and is not actually physically fracturing it, although i presume tweaking the engine to emit a further variety can not be so hard.. but what do i know.

     

    the only idea i could still come up with is using compositing. simply render the exact same scene out 3 times with different refraction settings close to each other without using any chromatic effects in cinema. i experimented with 1.61, 1.63 and 1.65 and used the color correction effect in render settings to render each refraction setting out with one color each, red ,green then blue. in photoshop or where ever you might do that you compose the 3 RGB layers together and set the upper two layers to difference. its a little extra work but can also be done as a film sequence so definitely doable.

     

    composit.thumb.jpg.0b7fab8e295130404246b80df3406f93.jpg

     

    new.thumb.jpg.db2a1ac06e22e9003031a14cc8a808f8.jpg

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    I'm not sure that chromatic aberration is what you're after TBH. That is a method for making subtle colour offsets to mimic refraction within camera lenses.

    You seem to be after a stronger effect that mimics a light being split into it's composite elements (by a prism for example). You could try faking this by using very slightly offset R, G, B lights. (Or finding a dedicated plugin to do it)

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