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RichMed

Render with PANTONE colours

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I have been asked to create some images for our packaging, however, these are made up of 2 Spot/PANTONE colours only, not CMYK.

 

Can I do this in C4D, and how do i do it.

 

Many thanks in advance.

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Since CMYK/Pantone colors are meant for printing, where each color is layed down from separate plates, theoretically, you could approach this as a multi-pass composite. Basically, you would need 4 material ID passes representative of the CMYK spot colors, which you would use to place the corresponding colors in post, then layer up the other needed passes (shadows, AO, reflection, etc).

 

But most package designs are complex, using gradients, text, and other graphics, which would make using material ID passes a PIA.

 

That said, I would consider just converting those spot colors to HSV values. Make sure you render the object in neutral white light, then convert the render to CMYK in post and make careful color adjustments to get them as close as possible to the pantone reference.

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  • Thanks Vizn, you're right, it does sound a PIA!!!

     

    Unfortunately our packaging only use 2 pantone colours so trying to find a close match wont work, it has to be the exact pantones.

     

    So if I was doing this, would I have one material for one colour and the another for the second colour?Then do 2 passes to capture these two materials???

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    2 hours ago, RichMed said:

    So if I was doing this, would I have one material for one colour and the another for the second colour?Then do 2 passes to capture these two materials???

    Forgive me as I am not too familiar with multi-pass setup with C4D's built in renderers. However, a material ID pass typically assigns a different color for each material as long as you set up the IDs right, so it could be just one pass if that is the case.

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    @RichMed So you're creating images for some packaging. Is that just a design concept to show the suits, or are you eventually going to print these C4D generated images on a traditional press? Big difference right there. I suppose it could be both. You could design the packages in Illustrator using the correct PMS colors, bring into C4D and create images, but use the Illustrator files when it's time to send out to print. Not sure what your deal is.

     

    Another major issue you're facing here. It is VERY difficult to get a perfect color match like a PMS color on screen or even a digital print. You'll pull your hair out trying. Also, keep this in mind. @Vizn was on the right track if you are printing your C4D-generated images on a press. Pantone (PMS) is not a color build like CMYK. It's literally ink that the printer will mix from a recipe to get an exact color. The good thing is that even if your on-screen color is off, you can be confident that the color on press will be perfect. You would need to do some trickery to get the colors properly separated and ready for a printing press, but I'd recommend asking the guys at the print house for advice.

     

    I'm not even going to go into Pantone Coated, Uncoated, Metallic, Neon, Varnish, etc. This advice comes from someone with 20 years of print graphics under my belt before jumping to video. Good luck and post any more questions.

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  • @BigAl3D Thanks for the reply, and like yourself,I also have 20 years experience as a graphic designer dealing with print materials, its only the past year that I have started to branch out into the 3D world and boy, is it different!!!

     

    The background, in a nutshell, our packaging was created by a design agency and they chose, for cost purposes, 2 spot colours. These are 'Pantone Cool Grey 11 C' and 1 other depending on the product brand...we have several.

     

    On each pack we show the product, this has to be 2 colour like above. In the past we had an external company render these images for us as 2 spot colours but I do not know how and I can't really ask them as by brining the 3D 'in-house', we have taken our business away from them.

     

    Could this be done in prepress like photoshop for example once C4D has done the render perhaps?

     

    Rich

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    I would just treat the render the same way you would treat a photograph, i.e. render it out and create a spot colour ( alpha ) from the appropriate area, which i then assume gets passed off to illustrator for the AW, where the spot is dialled in.

     

    Deck

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    I second @BigAl3D's suggestion of working this backwards, by starting with the printers and finding out how they print the packaging. The method you end up using to render and apply the spot colors will likely depend on whether they use a digital printer vs a web or sheet fed machine.

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    I remember one job many years ago where I needed to provide spot colors out of Photoshop. Well, Photoshop could not do spot colors back then. So I got clever and used the CMYK channels and pasted spot color 1 in the cyan channel and spot color 2 in the black channel. The color channel doesn't matter, but it allowed me to output to separated plates, one for each Pantone color. On screen this looks a mess, but these two plates are what the (traditional) printer is looking for. They simply use PMS ink you tell them for each plate.

     

    Photoshop has evolved and can now handle spot colors, however, I have never utilized this feature. Here's a link from Adobe:

     

    https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/printing-spot-colors.html

     

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    I'm mainly replying to watch this thread. 

     

    I know that depending on what type of HDRI you're using (if you are) can totally change the color cast of your image. I usually use a studio HDRI that has very little color cast on it. A trick  some other 3d friends use is to take an HDRI/EXR that you like and remove most of the color in Photoshop. You may still have to go into an image editor and adjust the color after rendering though to try and target the PMS colors you want. 

     

    The new Pantone+ palettes all use LAB colors though. Which might make them more accurate on screen. 

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    On 1/25/2019 at 7:23 PM, BigAl3D said:

    I remember one job many years ago where I needed to provide spot colors out of Photoshop. Well, Photoshop could not do spot colors back then. So I got clever and used the CMYK channels and pasted spot color 1 in the cyan channel and spot color 2 in the black channel. The color channel doesn't matter, but it allowed me to output to separated plates, one for each Pantone color. On screen this looks a mess, but these two plates are what the (traditional) printer is looking for. They simply use PMS ink you tell them for each plate.

     

    Photoshop has evolved and can now handle spot colors, however, I have never utilized this feature. Here's a link from Adobe:

     

    https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/printing-spot-colors.html

     

    That's a clever trick. I'll have to remember that one. Thanks.

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