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Vertex Helix

3D and DAILY LIFE

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Just sharing some  thoughts really...

 

So I 'm convinced at this point that working in 3D changes sooner or later some parts of your brain wiring. This is neither good or bad on its own. I have noticed however that after intense work for weeks I can start feeling detached from the physical world.

 

Here's some funny thoughts that I recall crossing my mind the past few weeks:

- Taking a few minutes to enjoy the sunset: "Oh it's lovely....but I would pump up the saturation on blue and roll off some gamma(!)"

- Noticing the bark of a tree: "Now I know there's a pole in there and it should be right here..."

-10' in my first (and last) yoga training: "Oh that's gonna brake the rig for sure..."

 

In case you're having similar thoughts please feel free to share. Not only we can have some laughs, but it's nice to know you're not alone on this haha

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We'll there's certainly some things that are annoying as hell in the daily life, especially if the people around you are not into 3D.

 

  • I can't watch ANY movie without overanalyzing the CG. I constantly look for sh*** / misaligned materials, unconvincing lighting / shading and visible polygons in objects. Also compositing. Finding the exact spot the greenscreen begins and ends. It really is a curse because it ruined a lot of movies for me where my friends thought it looked, quote, "photorealistic".
  • As soon as I see any interesting material while going out or shopping or something I instantly try to build that material in my head. Same for complex / interesting shapes. People around me have told me that I tend to... stare at surfaces from time to time.

 

Guess we're all weird in our own way :306:

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Oh yes - for pretty much everything I look at for longer than 5 seconds now, my brain will be overlaying virtual polygons and auto-suggesting edge flow and all-quad topology options. I look at trees, and see L-systems, I look at the ocean and wonder about fluid solvers, and when I see sunsets and clouds I wish the Physical Sky was better :) Whenever I find myself somewhere truly beautiful I still manage to hold on to that sense of awe at nature, but at the same time, my brain is also very much working out how we might get an HDRI of that :)

 

Seriously though - I suspect 3Ding is like musicianing, in that it gets certain parts of the brain practiced at thinking a certain way, and doing activities like music or 3D will of course open up new pathways, possibilities and ways of thinking as you improve your skills. I never used to be able to see 20 moves ahead when modelling for example, but years in Cinema has slowly retrained my brain to be able to do that. Indeed it has also increased my precision and general levels of diligence and technique, and I am now programmed to enjoy efficiency of action and an immaculately organised Object Manager in a way that was positively alien to me when I started. 

 

On the negative side, I have never seen anything that comes close to the massive periods of lost time that can happen when you are 'on one' in 3D. The amount of times I have thought to myself at 7 pm one evening  'Oh, I'll just pop in there and tweak that topology for 10 minutes', and then there's the dawn, and 15 hours have mysteriously disappeared. Can't believe I'm the only one that happens to !! :)

 

CBR

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  • I hear you both! Socially wise 3D accounts for some lost whole calendar years....now that I think about it,  where did 2018 go?:ohmy:

     

    Too few recollections AFK...

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    Ehehe... This Baggins...

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    Indeed. Trying to pick apart CG in television and movies started for me when I began taking classes for 3D, animation, texture painting, etc and has never really stopped since. I've only really been doing Arch-Vis my entire career which arguably is a simpler niche of CG, though I am pretty familiar with the other areas out of pure interest. I'm often noticing details in the way architectural structures, systems, and millwork are actually built. It's definitely not as demanding as character modeling, rigging, and animation, which there's no easy way around, but with arch-vis a lot of the times we're translating (faking?) those smaller details with textures or simplified geo because the actual detail won't often show up (or would make the scene too heavy) because the views are so vast. I also look at materials in the real world as reference and try to take mental notes of how certain characteristics appear like reflection levels, roughness,  etc. at whatever time of day/lighting conditions it may be at the time.

     

    One could argue that 3D artists have a greater ability to see 'The Matrix'! ;)

     

    Sometimes I am almost convinced that we may actually be living in a complex computer simulation..but I digress. :)

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    I know what you mean.  After some long sessions it feels like I'm walking through a sea of polygons which start to boggle my mind.  As I look closer I'm taken away by the lack of repeating textures.  As water falls I think of how many years of computing that must have taken.

     

    Something similar happened when I was making materials in Unreal Engine and came back to making materials in C4D.  My brain was so locked into thinking how to make materials in Unreal I had to remake how to do the same things in C4D.  One example is Unreal can use a 4 color map with R,G,B,A with each channel being used as a map for how much a specific material is seen.  This way by painting R,G,B, or A on a single object you can say how much of what material should be in that area.  Specifically you could have a dirt texture on R, a grass texture on G, a wet dirt texture on B, a sand texture on A and have a perfect blending between them using this method.  Unreal has so many other tricks used it is really interesting.

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    Once you learn how the sausage is made...

     

    I seriously have wished for a good ctrl+z many times in life.

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  • How did you spot me @jed? How did you get your hands on that picture...? That was supposed to be double locked in the drawer!

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