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Kahuna

Removing seams in objects

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I wasn't quite sure what question I was asking, so I hope the title isn't too vague.

 

The issue I'm having is with seams such as the ones you can see in the image and project.  I'm wondering if there's a way to minimise or remove them altogether when unwrapping a UV and applying textures to the UV map.  On the other hand, I might be going about it all wrong.  What would be great is if I could unwrap a UV and have the entire edge of an object as one long section on the UV mesh, instead of being broken into 4 pieces.

 

Thanks

seams.jpg

seams.zip

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Seams are always going to exist where a 2D texture is applied to a 3D object, so you only have 2 choices:  Put them where the camera isn't, or hide them. The second option (which would involve painting over them in BP) is not really suited to photographic textures, so placing seams round the back and inside of stuff would seem to make the most sense in your case.

 

There is a 3rd option though, where UVs are less important and seams are hidden by default. Look up my previous posts on Tri-planar Mapping for more info about that...

 

CBR

 

 

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If I may add I noticed that your Uving was set to automatic which led to multiple seams. Your cylinder part for example needs only one seam to unwrap.

So one seam is obviously easier to hide.  Also don't forget if you apply a non hand painted texture you're better off with a seamless/tileable texture.

 

I attach your file with improved UVs and a procedural tileable texture.

Seams.rar

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  • Sage advice as always.  Thank you, gentlemen.

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  • I don't suppose one of you has a link to a simpleton's guide to moving seams do you?  There doesn't seem to be any easily searchable content on Google.

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    You don't so much move seams, as define them elsewhere, if you see what I mean, which you probably don't :)

     

    In the case of a cylinder (nice simple example), which as @Vertex Helix rightly adds, only needs the one, it doesn't matter where the seam goes because you can just rotate the object until it's at the back ! Or if the front needs to remain the front, then you can do a very similar thing by using the offsets using Cylindrical Mapping in the Material Tag to move the seam out of sight without affecting the geo.

     

    In the UV Peeler (a special tool designed to work with cylindrical forms), you begin to use that tool by defining any edge you want, and by doing so you have defined where the seam will be in the resulting UV map.

     

    https://vimeo.com/102375320

     

    If you are UV'ing something that isn't a cylinder you define seams by selecting certain edges - the trick is know what edges, and why - and it is this initial hump that causes so many people to dismiss it as 'difficult' and avoid it like the plague ! If only they knew that once they surmounted this little bump they would be able to easily UV anything forever afterwards and they'd stop whinging (so much) about Cinemas rubbish UV tools, which are actually mostly fine* once you know what you're doing ! ;)

     

    The other major skill to have in this area is to know when something requires UV mapping, and when it doesn't, where a Standard Projection, or something like TriPlanar Mapping will do, which is much more often that you'd think... in the case of your cylinder for example, is there any reason why Standard Cylindrical Mapping has been ignored for a UV based solution ?

     

    Cafe Founder @3DKiwi has made an excellent series that covers BodyPaint and UV mapping in exhaustive detail (now for free over on Vimeo), and it's certainly the most thorough, clocking in at maybe 9 hrs or so, but I learned everything I needed to know about UV mapping from this 30 minute Youtube video...

     

     

     

    CBR

     

    *by 'fine' I mean 'adequate'. Our UV tools are VERY old, and VERY out of date compared to everyone else's. Those guys have pretty much 3-click solutions to UVing most things, and they usually have the relax brush we are sorely lacking...

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    Plus one on this tut. One of the most useful out there.

    @Kahuna do check out the UV Vonc plugin for UV operations inside C4D:

     Made UVing inside C4D a bit more modern and operational, (but still ridiculously outdated as Cerbera notes)

    Moreover, since there's still no native TRIPLANAR mode inside C4D, there's a hack to achieve it using gradients (invented by the very talented and experienced Mario Tran Phuc)

    The idea is to use linear gradients as layer masks on each axis separately. Have a look, it's pretty clever:

    Triplanar3.JPG

    Triplanar2.JPG

    Triplanar1.JPG

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  • 4 hours ago, Cerbera said:

     in the case of your cylinder for example, is there any reason why Standard Cylindrical Mapping has been ignored for a UV based solution ?

    The main reason was so I could bring it into Substance Painter to apply an aged/worn painted wood effect, which I find easier than using vertex weight in C4D

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    Got you...Then you're good. Take the model with the new UVs in Substance Painter, bake its maps in texture settings so you get all the procedural goodies from smart materials and masks, and if you still have the seam visible make a layer in Triplanar mode (black mask/fill/and paint on top)

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  • This may just be adding a whole new level of stupidity to my original question, but what do yo think to the idea of exporting from C4D and importing into Blender to unwrap the UV?  Blender seems to have much more intuitive controls, such as selecting seams before unwrapping.  Am I barking up the wrong tree?  If not, what would be the best format to export to Blender, considering that I will ultimately want an FBX to import into Substance Painter.

     

    I should add that, if Blender is better for unwrapping, it's a pretty good tool for free.

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    22 minutes ago, Kahuna said:

    but what do yo think to the idea of exporting from C4D and importing into Blender to unwrap the UV?  Blender seems to have much more intuitive controls, such as selecting seams before unwrapping. 

    Blender does have superior UV tools, and you should use whatever gets the job done in the best way for you at the end of the day. I was just trying to show you that you can UV map anything in Cinema if you are so minded to do so - but that is not to say other apps won't do it faster.

     

    CBR

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    Oh, nobody has mentioned Seamilar or its little brother Easy UV yet, the plugins that makes seaming and UVing in Cinema incredibly easy...

    They're worth checking out before you get a whole new program involved...

     

    CBR

     

     

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