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Spencer Fanuka

Taking my modeling to the next level

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Hey yall,

 

So I've taken on the task of trying to model everything in my room to sharpen my C4D skills. Right now I'm in the modeling phase of everything. I feel like I'm good with spline modeling, and modeling things out of shapes using the extrude tools, bevel, etc... However, I look around my room, and can't seem to fathom how to model some of the stuff, such as an xbox controller. As a self-taught person, it can be hard to find the right resources sometimes, and it can be hard to understand C4D's capabilities. My question for everybody is what other modeling techniques are important to learn to take my modeling to the next level? As a self-taught person, I just don't know WHAT to look up. Just some keywords that I can google would be amazing.

 

Thanks,

Spencer

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There is really no special forumula on how to learn, depends on the person too. But what I can tell is that practice will make it perfect. If you know what you need to achieve in terms of topology, then its just trial and error and from that you learn. You can watch all the tutorials out there, but you are not going to gain skills by watchin, but simply doing. From watching tutorials, you sohuld be getting an idea how things are made, but in C4D, there is usualy a few way of doing things.

 

For example, if you know that the model should be all quads then aim for all quads no matter what. In the proccess of problem solving, you learn. Some will be harded, some problems will be easier. Take one object in your room, try to think about mesh before starting modeling, how the topology should look like and then once figured out, start working. Try different tool, use them and abuse them as much as you can. Jay will have more things to tell, so until he comes to rescue, just try to model and have a goal to make everything from quads...


| MAXON Quality Assurance Specialist | 3D Asset Creatior | C4D Cafe Manager | Gamer in Heart | :compEnjoy:

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There are 3 core types of modelling at which you must be proficient if your goal is to be a decent all-round modeller with above-average skills. Those areas are:

  • Subdivision Surface Poly modelling (mainly for organic / character forms)
  • Hard Surface Modelling (mainly for non-organic forms, doesn't involve SDS)
  • Sculpting and Retopology (good for roughing out forms, adding hi-res detail or modelling complex organic shapes that would be inefficient to do via regular modelling)

So first order of the day is learning the principals and rules that apply to each approach, and how the specific tools of Cinema apply in each context - ie what you should and shouldn't use them for. 

 

Then I'd say make your poly modelling as good as it possibly can be, which means thoroughly understanding edge flow, and how to redirect it at will, and to be able to solve tris and ngons to quads in any topological situation, and to be able to see what the edge flow should ideally be just by looking at any form. That process alone can take years and years to master, so that is what requires the most work IMO, and is perhaps the hardest skill to teach as most of it comes direct from experience.  However there is some advantage to being sat down and told, right from the start what the rules are, so that's why I offer 4 hour 'modelling starter' skype sessions that provide this vital info, supported by numerous reference sheets / notes to make sure you don't forget it ! It's also useful in that you can ask questions as we go through it. (PM me if that interests you).

 

I'm confident that everything in your room could be made using one or more of the 3 approaches above, including the xbox controller, (which should use the first method).  

 

You need to get into the habit of 'seeing' topologically. Wherever I go now, my brain pretty much automatically overlays virtual polylines over everything I look at for any length of time, which is very helpful as you can practice it anywhere. It's especially helpful for passing time when waiting in traffic jams or at subways etc, because the back of cars and general infrastructure are usually quite interesting in that regard 🙂  I start most projects with a good half an hour's 'purposeful staring' at reference of what I am going to make !*

 

Modelling the stuff in your room is a good way to practice - I certainly remember doing that at one point.

 

If you are proficient in each of the 3 areas above that is pretty much all your modelling bases covered, but very important not to neglect the other areas of Cinema that allow you to produce a final result - ie UVing, texturing, proper lighting (as different from HDRI on sky, GI and hope for the best!) rendering, and compositing...

 

CBR

 

* Don't do this at girls in bars - it is hard to explain that you are staring because you are 'plotting the topology of your interesting and unusually angular nose' 😉

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  • 1 hour ago, Igor said:

    There is really no special forumula on how to learn, depends on the person too. But what I can tell is that practice will make it perfect. If you know what you need to achieve in terms of topology, then its just trial and error and from that you learn. You can watch all the tutorials out there, but you are not going to gain skills by watchin, but simply doing. From watching tutorials, you sohuld be getting an idea how things are made, but in C4D, there is usualy a few way of doing things.

     

    For example, if you know that the model should be all quads then aim for all quads no matter what. In the proccess of problem solving, you learn. Some will be harded, some problems will be easier. Take one object in your room, try to think about mesh before starting modeling, how the topology should look like and then once figured out, start working. Try different tool, use them and abuse them as much as you can. Jay will have more things to tell, so until he comes to rescue, just try to model and have a goal to make everything from quads...

    Ok. That's pretty much why I wanted to model everything in my room. To practice and learn from my mistakes because I too agree that experience is the best way to learn. Thanks for the response. 

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  • 12 minutes ago, Cerbera said:

    There are 3 core types of modelling at which you must be proficient if your goal is to be a decent all-round modeller with above-average skills. Those areas are:

    • Subdivision Surface Poly modelling (mainly for organic / character forms)
    • Hard Surface Modelling (mainly for non-organic forms, doesn't involve SDS)
    • Sculpting and Retopology (good for roughing out forms, adding hi-res detail or modelling complex organic shapes that would be inefficient to do via regular modelling)

    So first order of the day is learning the principals and rules that apply to each approach, and how the specific tools of Cinema apply in each context - ie what you should and shouldn't use them for. 

     

    Then I'd say make your poly modelling as good as it possibly can be, which means thoroughly understanding edge flow, and how to redirect it at will, and to be able to solve tris and ngons to quads in any topological situation, and to be able to see what the edge flow should ideally be just by looking at any form. That process alone can take years and years to master, so that is what requires the most work IMO, and is perhaps the hardest skill to teach as most of it comes direct from experience.  However there is some advantage to being sat down and told, right from the start what the rules are, so that's why I offer 4 hour 'modelling starter' skype sessions that provide this vital info, supported by numerous reference sheets / notes to make sure you don't forget it ! It's also useful in that you can ask questions as we go through it. (PM me if that interests you).

     

    I'm confident that everything in your room could be made using one or more of the 3 approaches above, including the xbox controller, (which should use the first method).  

     

    You need to get into the habit of 'seeing' topologically. Wherever I go now, my brain pretty much automatically overlays virtual polylines over everything I look at for any length of time, which is very helpful as you can practice it anywhere. It's especially helpful for passing time when waiting in traffic jams or at subways etc, because the back of cars and general infrastructure are usually quite interesting in that regard 🙂  I start most projects with a good half an hour's 'purposeful staring' at reference of what I am going to make !*

     

    Modelling the stuff in your room is a good way to practice - I certainly remember doing that at one point.

     

    If you are proficient in each of the 3 areas above that is pretty much all your modelling bases covered, but very important not to neglect the other areas of Cinema that allow you to produce a final result - ie UVing, texturing, proper lighting (as different from HDRI on sky, GI and hope for the best!) rendering, and compositing...

     

    CBR

     

    * Don't do this at girls in bars - it is hard to explain that you are staring because you are 'plotting the topology of your interesting and unusually angular nose' 😉

    From what you're saying I can already tell my scene is a mess LOL. I've really just been bullshitting my way through the scene. I'm definitely interested in a Skype session and will PM you shortly. Can't wait to topologize some girl's butts 😎.

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    Hi Spencer

     

    Why not post your models up as you make them, get some feedback.

     

    Dan

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  • 16 minutes ago, Rectro said:

    Hi Spencer

     

    Why not post your models up as you make them, get some feedback.

     

    Dan

    Ok. What's the best way to go about it? Copying and pasting the models into separate files. I can't upload the full file because of the file size limit, correct?

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    Just screen shots with wires for each object you make, good to keep a thread of your own work going, keep you motivated to look back on your progress.  Jay with set you up right with one to one.

     

    Dan

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    You can use WeTransfer, or Google Drive or Dropbox for sharing files! 😉

     


    | MAXON Quality Assurance Specialist | 3D Asset Creatior | C4D Cafe Manager | Gamer in Heart | :compEnjoy:

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    Generally though, we only need to see the complete file if the wireframe screenies don't show us enough detail or you are asking a specific question about something....

     

    CBR

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    Do you have tutorial MILG 11? If not, maybe there will be some discount thru Black Friday (was all the years)...

     

    https://motionworks.net/shop/making-it-look-great-11/

     

    For me it is the best modeling training in last years. Worth every cent...

     

     

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