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AleksSin

How Would You Model This Curvature?

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Hi everyone,

 

I am in the process of working on a product design case study where I am trying to model the Fitbit Versa Fitness tracker and I am running into a wall when it comes to designing the curvature on the back of the device. I cant seem to get that subtle curvature to match the product images I am referencing. I was able to design the rest of the device including the glass, but for some reason when I try to create that subtle rounded back it doesn't look like the images I am referencing.

 

I attached a 2 profile image and another photo I pulled from google. If anyone knows how I can resolve this issue I will be super grateful! I have also attached a few images of the c4d project I made to show my progress and pain point. Thanks!

Versa Product Images_0.jpg

versa-8-1522049924-gpox-column-width-inline-1547795854-PZIf-column-width-inline.jpg

Versa Back.JPG

Versa Front.JPG

Versa Side.JPG

Edited by Cerbera
Removed incorrect tags

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Welcome to the cafe !

 

You haven't shown us any of your topology so we can't see if what you have done is suitable ! Please post the wires (gouraud shading + lines mode)  or better still the c4d file itself so we can properly look round the model !

 

Also please update your profile so we know which version you are working in, and maybe have a read of our 'How to Post' page...

 

Thanks

 

CBR

Edited by Cerbera
added info... pls refresh page

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Did you used Loft/Extrude from splines? For main body of watches I would use SDS workflow and other parts (glass, metal) maybe  beveled polymesh/extruded splines...

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This is the sort of topology you need to make that surface, which ideally needs to be made using polygon modelling techniques, not splines...

 

This version uses symmetry and Subdivision surfaces to create nice curves from a low poly mesh. It was started from the centre section out using a disc primitive.

 

image.thumb.png.9a4f8b0f0d3de5176733d556344bd474.png

 

Base model on left, SDS result on right...

 

image.thumb.png.64a5f53816934839504179b2cb13e80d.png

 

In this 5 minute example I did forget to add the subtle curvature in one direction of the perimeter, but hopefully you get the idea, and this topology is still ideal for that.

 

Or, if you are OK with making the sensor pads in the centre out of separate meshes, then you could possibly make the body out of splines in a Loft generator, rather than the extrude you are presumably using now, but nothing is going to get as good a result as making it properly out of polygons....

 

CBR

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Hi Cerbera, just a stupid question: why so many subdivisions on the base mesh? Were these necessary to hold the curvature of the middle section?

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1 hour ago, Adrien said:

Hi Cerbera, just a stupid question: why so many subdivisions on the base mesh? Were these necessary to hold the curvature of the middle section?

Not a stupid question, but not entirely sure in which direction you mean; they were necessary to support the curvy inner shape (XZ) and slight bulging (also XZ) in the outer ones, rather than to support the gentle Y bulge along the depth of the object. That's not to say that couldn't have been done with less polys, but there is no harm in using more if it helps achieve better, more precise rounding.

 

The middle section of the rounded bit could indeed have had less of the loops inside it, but knowing as I do that SDS prefers even geometry I added those in for general poly size consistency and with a half a mind that they could also support the sensors in the middle if they had to be made out of a single mesh... so given that these loops also provide additional XY curvature definition, this is an example of using the same loops for 3 different purposes, which is a reasonable example of how good modellers think.

 

Here's what the front side would look like based on the same border topology (but separate mesh made by splitting off a row of polys from the frame) but now distributed differently because we don't need to match an inner circular bit...

 

 

image.thumb.png.beaf02b37006bd3baa05deab7d36870f.png

 

But this raises your question again. As there is no Y depth curvature at all on the screen side of the device, then technically we could use as few loops as we need to merely match the gently bulging sides on XZ, which is about half that density, but its an overall neater job to just make them match, and there is nothing about this project that suggests we need to prioritise polygon economy...

 

Note the additional loops along the depth of the frame necessary for later cutting in the strap holes...

 

CBR

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Makes perfect sense to me now, many thanks for your clarifications. 

 

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