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Your process modelling complex shapes?


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Hello,

 

Just wanted to see if anyone good at subdivision modelling could share their process for tackling a complex modelling object. 

 

I've been trying to model just the body of the DJI Mac 2 PRO drone, but as soon as I've modelled the basic shape and starting to change perspective views for background references, my brain turns to mush and I can't understand how to go on. 

 

So first I did model the shape from the top view. Then when I go to the front view, there are so many points and basically, my brain turns to mush and I don't get it. 

 

https://imgur.com/a/OO5KmYf

https://imgur.com/a/B2Oqjyi

(The images are a bit bright because I'm having some weird bug where I can't lower the transparency).

 

I can look at a model and figure out how the typology could look like, but then when I model it and start to change different perspectives, I get so confused by all the angles and points. 

 

So what I'm really trying to figure out is what's your process when it comes to more complex models? 

I'm 100% sure I'm just doing it the wrong way somehow. 

 

I've also attached the project file if you want to take a look.

 

Thank you!
 

 

 

 

 

C4dCafe.c4d

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Don't be too disappointed in yourself - modelling is easy to start, but hard to perfect and it takes about 5 years to become properly competent at it ! But equally, there is no way I can condense  20 years of modelling experience into a single forum post. And there is no 'one answer' that will work for every model - the kind of form you are intending to make and its final use / function entirely dictate the approach(es) required to model it.

 

In general though, your models will either be organic or hard-surface. Organic shapes usually benefit from a staged subdivision approach to modelling, whereas hard surfaces don't require SDS and usually rely on bevels and phong shading to achieve their surface qualities. 

 

Difficult to analyse your model without knowing what it is meant to be, or what the final should look like, or where it will be used.

 

But the bare essentials are:

 

1. Learn the rules of general polygon modelling.

2. Learn the extra rules of Subdivision surface modelling

3. Model something simple every day

4. Watch 1000s of tutorials of other competent modellers at work.

5. Don't do anything too complex too soon.

 

If it helps I do modelling 101 skype sessions for those looking for a head start in this department (please PM me if interested).

 

No. 4 is very easy to help with - start watching the tutorials by Contrafibbularities over on Youtube ! Wolfgang is an excellent modeller.

 

https://www.youtube.com/user/WolfgangRode/videos

 

Likewise Arrimus 3D, working in 3DS Max (but recently defected to Blender). Don't dismiss tutorials just because they are using different software. The skills and topology solving skills are universal, so there is a lot to be learned from them too.

 

CBR

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Cerbera said:

Don't be too disappointed in yourself - modelling is easy to start, but hard to perfect and it takes about 5 years to become properly competent at it ! But equally, there is no way I can condense  20 years of modelling experience into a single forum post. And there is no 'one answer' that will work for every model - the kind of form you are intending to make and its final use / function entirely dictate the approach(es) required to model it.

 

In general though, your models will either be organic or hard-surface. Organic shapes usually benefit from a staged subdivision approach to modelling, whereas hard surfaces don't require SDS and usually rely on bevels and phong shading to achieve their surface qualities. 

 

Difficult to analyse your model without knowing what it is meant to be, or what the final should look like, or where it will be used.

 

But the bare essentials are:

 

1. Learn the rules of general polygon modelling.

2. Learn the extra rules of Subdivision surface modelling

3. Model something simple every day

4. Watch 1000s of tutorials of other competent modellers at work.

5. Don't do anything too complex too soon.

 

If it helps I do modelling 101 skype sessions for those looking for a head start in this department (please PM me if interested).

 

No. 4 is very easy to help with - start watching the tutorials by Contrafibbularities over on Youtube ! Wolfgang is an excellent modeller.

 

https://www.youtube.com/user/WolfgangRode/videos

 

CBR

 

 

 

Thank you very much! The idea was to make some small animations for the drone and make it come to Life. 

Will check out the tutorials as a start :). 

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I had a little time to go back and look at your specific shape. In the attached I have fixed all the errors in it, and added some loops to show you how we might make that shape with more even polys. So, in the examples below, the back row shows the render result, and the middle shows the equivalent wireframes.

 

So, left to right, we start with...

 

image.thumb.png.e487a69ef468a9f3eecad36f1b789e3a.png

 

1. The Base Mesh. The errors I fixed in your original included:

 

- 2 x Polys along the symmetry centreline

- Normals wrong direction

- Non-planar polys everywhere

- Untidy / inconsistent edge layout

 

Then I added some loops to give us much more evenly sized polygons everywhere.

This model could go either way into hard surface or organic subdivision modelling, so we will look at both...

 

2. Hard surface.

 

With the application of a Bevel deformer (Chamfer Mode) we can add edge rounding to our base mesh, and now we are in a hard surface modelling workflow. SDS is not needed for this - as you can hopefully see, clay render looks very neat.

 

3. Subdivision Surface Workflow.

 

Here we have simply put the base mesh under an SDS object. It doesn't collapse completely because of our even poly distribution and the density of those polys, but it does go much more organic in form.

 

4. Supported SDS. If we now add what are called support edges (or control loops) using (in this example) a bevel deformer (but this time in Solid Mode) and put that under SDS then we get to keep all our hard edges and curves, and the form is now considered to be 'supported', so holds its shape under SDS in a way that 3 didn't.

 

Hopefully that serves to illustrate the difference between the various approaches, and offers some insight into what was wrong with your first attempt...

 

And here's the scene file so you can have a proper look round all that...

 

Types of Model - SDS-HardSurface.c4d

 

Hope that helps

 

CBR

 

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34 minutes ago, Cerbera said:

I had a little time to go back and look at your specific shape. In the attached I have fixed all the errors in it, and added some loops to show you how we might make that shape with more even polys. So, in the examples below, the back row shows the render result, and the middle shows the equivalent wireframes.

...

 

Hope that helps

 

CBR

 

 

A big thank you for taking your time and doing this detailed help! I'm going to download the project file and look around a bit more :). Again, thank you very much!

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48 minutes ago, Cerbera said:

 

 

 

- Normals wrong direction

 

 

 

I looked over my original shape vs the ones you did and I can now see all the things I messed up with my shape, except the normals which I don't really understand. 

 

https://imgur.com/a/DkjpDOh - Here is an image where my original shape is on the left and your shape on the right. By looking at this, it seems like my normals are going in the right direction. Am I missing something here?

 

Thank you!

 

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1 hour ago, Iwanttolearn said:

Am I missing something here?

 

No don't worry - I just checked and your original was OK in this regard. I think the Normals probably got switched at some point as I was removing polys and adding loops etc, and I initially assumed that was the case since file open. So my bad there 🙂

 

CBR

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13 minutes ago, Cerbera said:

 

No don't worry - I just checked and your original was OK in this regard. I think the Normals probably got switched at some point as I was removing polys and adding loops etc, and I initially assumed that was the case since file open. So my bad there 🙂

 

CBR

Ah okay :). 

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