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I am creating a title bug for a music production studio, and it includes a 3D model of a guitar.  I want to animate the strings at one point so they look like someone has played a chord on the instrument.

T he strings are made of cylinder objects which have been made editable.  I  want to introduce a sine wave deformation that will travel up and down the string over a couple of seconds.  I'm thinking there's probably a couple of different ways to do this but I've been looking at from sample/tutorial videos online and nothing seems quite right. 

 

Any suggestions are appreciated.

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Speaking as a guitarist and music producer among other things, when a guitar is strummed you wouldn't see any sinusoidal movement in the strings, even the lowest ones - the overall perception to the eye is only that if it is slowed down massively, or the note being played is ridiculously low. So for that reason I would instead animate an 'up' frame and a 'down' frame, where the strings deform from the point the pick hit them, and then motion blur between them to get the overall effect of a string being strummed.

 

But if sine movement is what you want, then I don't think you can use your existing strings - you need new ones that are based on splines that can be displaced by, say, a formula effector. If you could make that work for you then you'd only have to keyframe 3 parameters therein to get the effect (scale in 2 directions and falloff). Then you could just sweep those splines to make them renderable. That works just fine on a straight string made from a helix, but of course guitar strings don't do that because they have to go from tuning pegs through the nut and over the saddle and terminate in the bridge, which requires a lot of angles.

 

However, the only place the string vibrates is between the saddle and the nut, which, in theory should be a straight section of spline, so the cheaty way would be to simply do those bits separately, and hide the joins somewhere in the hardware at either end (there are usually grooves in both nut and saddle which can help with this), but if you don't want to cheat and instead choose to make it form a single spline, then you can use secondary fields to further restrict the area affected by the deformer - just bear in mind you need to subdivide the spline segments you will be deforming so they have at least 100 points in them, enough to support the sinusoidal deformation...

 

There may be other ways too, so will be interested to see what anyone else contributes...

 

CBR

 

 

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  • I have no illusions about the idea I'm talking about being accurate and realistic.  But it's what the client has asked for, so that's what's important.

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  • Thanks, bezo, that looks pretty close to what I was looking for.

     

    Mike

     

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