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How to connect two objects?

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Greetings everyone, 

I'm new to C4D and I'm learning about modelling, so my question is pretty basic.  

I've made a hand from a cube and I would like to connect it to an arm made with a spline (see attached img). Do you have any idea on how I can do that? I tried with connect and Boole but it gets messy.

Thank you!

 

Screenshot 2020-05-15 at 13.49.31.png

Screenshot 2020-05-15 at 13.49.51.png

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Welcome to the cafe 🙂

 

You are learning a crucial lesson here about why forward planning is important in modelling. The amount of edges in the lowest part of the arm and wrist border of the hand need to be the same if they are to be joined correctly, and that doesn't happen by accident, but by design, and you needed to have had that in mind before you started either model so that you could make them match as part of the build process. Generally speaking it is not helpful to use a spline in any part of a character model - it just does not produce topology that is helpful to your end goal.

 

I can see you have a way to go about understanding poly flow, and why it matters (for example, we can't be having complex poles and geo this dense in what will (presumably) be an animated base mesh, so the hand needs a fair bit of sorting out before you join it to anything !), and that is beyond the scope of what can be explained properly in any 1 forum post, so ignoring those issues, the best way to proceed now (other than starting again with better edge flow and suitable poly density) would be to remove every other loop from the arm until the edge count on the border matches the hand, at which point you could stitch n sew them together.

 

It is worth noting that in a typical workflow for a non-photo-real character like this in an animation context, you only actually need 8 rotational segments running around the arm to be able to describe the form, and you should be working at that sort of poly density (presuming you are using Subdivision surfaces to smooth things). Using more than that is only making additional work for yourself for no added benefit*.

 

Bizarre that I have posted this in 2 replies on the cafe in as many days, but here is a video that shows what loops you actually need in a hand, and demos a thoughtful and excellent method for making it so...

 

 

Notice how even when creating a model that is more detailed than yours (and will invariably join to a a medium poly arm with more than 8 segments) he still requires less polys to do it, and even though each vertex requires individual attention, there remain relatively few of them, and subdivision is doing most of the heavy lifting here, as it should be...

 

CBR

 

*unless you genuinely do need additional detail in the arm to describe muscle tone for example...

 

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  • 2 hours ago, Cerbera said:

    Welcome to the cafe 🙂

     

    You are learning a crucial lesson here about why forward planning is important in modelling. The amount of edges in the lowest part of the arm and wrist border of the hand need to be the same if they are to be joined correctly, and that doesn't happen by accident, but by design, and you needed to have had that in mind before you started either model so that you could make them match as part of the build process. Generally speaking it is not helpful to use a spline in any part of a character model - it just does not produce topology that is helpful to your end goal.

     

    I can see you have a way to go about understanding poly flow, and why it matters (for example, we can't be having complex poles and geo this dense in what will (presumably) be an animated base mesh, so the hand needs a fair bit of sorting out before you join it to anything !), and that is beyond the scope of what can be explained properly in any 1 forum post, so ignoring those issues, the best way to proceed now (other than starting again with better edge flow and suitable poly density) would be to remove every other loop from the arm until the edge count on the border matches the hand, at which point you could stitch n sew them together.

     

    It is worth noting that in a typical workflow for a non-photo-real character like this in an animation context, you only actually need 8 rotational segments running around the arm to be able to describe the form, and you should be working at that sort of poly density (presuming you are using Subdivision surfaces to smooth things). Using more than that is only making additional work for yourself for no added benefit*.

     

    Bizarre that I have posted this in 2 replies on the cafe in as many days, but here is a video that shows what loops you actually need in a hand, and demos a thoughtful and excellent method for making it so...

     

     

    Notice how even when creating a model that is more detailed than yours (and will invariably join to a a medium poly arm with more than 8 segments) he still requires less polys to do it, and even though each vertex requires individual attention, there remain relatively few of them, and subdivision is doing most of the heavy lifting here, as it should be...

     

    CBR

     

    *unless you genuinely do need additional detail in the arm to describe muscle tone for example...

     

     

    Thank you so much for your advices and your help! I will definitely dig into learning more about proper modelling. 
    I managed to connect them with stitch n sew (see image below).

    I have another basic question about modelling, why do I get these cuts in the model?(see 2nd image) When I'm using the subdivision tool on an cube for example I then put the highest number on the subdivision editor and then get a smooth result. If I have a polygonal object how do I fix it? is there a tool I can use? and will I see these cuts once I render my object?

    Screenshot 2020-05-15 at 17.09.21.png

    Screenshot 2020-05-15 at 17.10.05.png

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    Those are not cuts - that is phong shading issues, which are unrelated. Fix those in the phong tag by increasing its angle limit to something like 60 or 70 degrees. If that still doesn't fix it then there is something else wrong with your underlying geometry, probably a non-manifold edge - ie internal geometry, which is illegal in poly modelling or incorrect normal direction.

     

    CBR

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