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Every now and then, I like to play around with a companies on-line PC configurator.  Some people like to look a fancy sport cars, boats, or homes.  I look to look at powerful computers.  But this one just blew me away:

 

  • 2 x Xeon Gold 6234 processors (3.3 GHz, 8 cores)
  • 128 Gb 2933MHz ECC RDIMM
  • 2 x NVIDIA Quadro RTX 5000 16Gb graphic cards
  • Intel VROC Premium M.2 RAID Controller
  • 2 x 1024 Gb SSD M.2 drives (RAID 1)  Boot Drive
  • 2 x 6TB SATA 7200 RPM SATA Drive (RAID 1)

 

and here is why it blew me away....

 

image.thumb.png.5f3583ae5e26cb4b0c00f43959358f13.png

 

Even if you don't believe in the $8000 savings, you have to admit that is a pretty good deal ($5030.61 USD).  But as far as entertainment value goes, configuring this machine actually made me wonder if the configurator was working!  The price was just not changing as much as you would expect! So I just kept going. Is this a 1 time in a hundred year sale due to COVID-19? 

 

Not sure. 

 

But it doesn't matter because I don't have the money nor the need for a new PC.  But it is nice to dream and one thing life has taught me is that dreams are cheap...so dream big.  Also, the wanting is always better than the having...

 

For those that do have the money and the need, the sale is still going on.

 

Dave

 

P.S. 

 

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I would go for the new AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X is a 64 core, 128 thread processor. 64 cores??? I remember when a DX2 486 was top dog.

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A buddy of mine built a crazy video editing monster using a 64-core Threadripper CPU. I asked him to run Cinebench. That thing got over 24,000 on the CPU test. Yeah. That's really fast.

Of course, it was a tad pricier than this deal. haha

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3 hours ago, Freemorpheme said:

And what site was this sale of the century found on?

Lenovo - Now they said the sale ended yesterday but while the coupon code "JUNESAVINGS" is still active, the discounts are different.  Not sure why,.  But one thing about Lenovo is that they ALWAYS have sales...which probably explains why I visit the site often because you could snag a whale.

 

Overall though, I am happy with Lenovo quality.  We use their laptops at work and they are pretty robust as I travel alot they do take a beating quite well.  HP quality stinks (just flat out no good).  Dell quality is only worth speaking about in their Precision series.  So Lenovo is probably the best you can find from the large scale manufacturers.  You can bet better quality from the boutique PC vendors (Puget Systems is the best IMHO), but you will pay more.

 

Now you can build your own but the warranty situation gets a little shaky as each component has different warranties - you need to be sure to register each one as well.   37 years building telecommunications gear all over the world (bringing up factories, assessing factory capabilities, moving production, introducing new product and processes, and fixing bad factories) has convinced me that there is a 1 in 10 chance that electronic products will fail in 3 years.  If you intend to keep your electronics gear for more than 3 years, you should consider paying for an extended warranty provided that cost for that extended warranty is less than 10% of the purchase price.  You can't get extended warranties for PC components but only for assembled units.  Dell Precision offers a 5 year warranty and I have made use of it on 3 different PC's -- all around the 3 year mark....go figure.

 

Dave

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On 6/4/2020 at 5:58 PM, BigAl3D said:

A buddy of mine built a crazy video editing monster using a 64-core Threadripper CPU. I asked him to run Cinebench. That thing got over 24,000 on the CPU test. Yeah. That's really fast.

Of course, it was a tad pricier than this deal. haha

 

Threadrippers really are the wet dream of everyone that uses multithreaded softwares. Their speed is just insane and if you don't need the very fastest of them they're not even THAT expensive.

I had the pleasure to build a Threadripper workstation with a buddy of mine about a year ago. I could not believe how damn huge those chips are.

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On 6/5/2020 at 5:19 PM, DasFrodo said:

 

Threadrippers really are the wet dream of everyone that uses multithreaded softwares. Their speed is just insane and if you don't need the very fastest of them they're not even THAT expensive.

I had the pleasure to build a Threadripper workstation with a buddy of mine about a year ago. I could not believe how damn huge those chips are.

Yeah....that socket used for the Threadripper's are the Socket TR4 which is a land grind array component (or LGA) that is about 58.5mm by 75mm.  But that is still NOT the largest ASIC component out there.  There are 75mm x 75mm BGA (ball grid array components) being used the in the telecommunications industry and I have even seen some 95mm x 95mm BGA's.  

 

When ASIC's get as big as the Threadrippers, you are literally fighting physics to get their sockets soldered to the motherboard.  Nothing is flat nor does it want to stay flat as the board and the socket cools after soldering.  And by flat we are talking no more than +/-3 mils (0.003" or 76 microns) across the entire socket land pattern on the motherboard.  There will always be inherent thermal stresses from cooling baked into the connections between the socket and the motherboard.  Add to that all that can go wrong as you attach a big heatsink to the socket.  If not done right, you can add even add more stress.  For those who build their own PC's with components of this size,  you may want invest in a torque wrench and hand tighten the heatsink in an X pattern and then finish with the torque wrench to spec - again, in an X pattern.

 

Once assembled, you are not out of the woods yet as you will be turning on and off the PC.  Turn it on, things heat up again.  Turn it off...things cool down.  Does the room have good cooling...in the summer?  Do that enough (which is called thermal cycling) and eventually all those baked in stresses from the initial assembly process begin to "relieve" --- or crack the joint.  You may still have electrical connections but it is not the best.

 

And we haven't even talked about tin-whisker growth or what can happen when un-activated flux gets left on the board by the motherboard vendor.  And PC's are consumer "Class 3" products with less restrictions on reliability than telecommunication Class 2 (or 2B) products.  Lord knows what you are getting on your motherboard.

 

I have yet to walk into any factory (and I have been to them all over world in China, Malaysia, Thailand, Mexico and the US) where they do some form of product configuration (add the CPU, put on the heatsinks, insert the DIMM's) similar to what you would do on a standard PC and not found something wrong.  

 

Yeah....I get the warranty. 

 

Dave

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9 hours ago, 3D-Pangel said:

When ASIC's get as big as the Threadrippers, you are literally fighting physics to get their sockets soldered to the motherboard.  Nothing is flat nor does it want to stay flat as the board and the socket cools after soldering.  And by flat we are talking no more than +/-3 mils (0.003" or 76 microns) across the entire socket land pattern on the motherboard.  There will always be inherent thermal stresses from cooling baked into the connections between the socket and the motherboard.  Add to that all that can go wrong as you attach a big heatsink to the socket.  If not done right, you can add even add more stress.  For those who build their own PC's with components of this size,  you may want invest in a torque wrench and hand tighten the heatsink in an X pattern and then finish with the torque wrench to spec - again, in an X pattern.

 

Well I mean Threadrippers come with a torque driver... specifically for installation of the CPU on the board.

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I blew 2 CPUs when I built my PC by overtightening the heatsink. Had no idea it was a thing. Took it to a repair place and got them to do it eventually, which was a wise investment.

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I was thinking of building a 3970 system - a first full build, and you guys are making me nervous 😅

 

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What Dave said. I have been building my own x86 PCs since 1986, (yes, it was a 4.77MHz XT). My new AMD system was the first that i let the company i ordererd from assemble. So much stuff can go wrong nowadays, even if the components are 100% to begin with. This way the risk was with the manufacturer and the extra price was well worth it.

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