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  • Silver Contributor
21 hours ago, DasFrodo said:

What were the CPUs?

They were 4770K. It's a bit too easy to make a PC these days, everything is very modular and simple to put together, so the first component I had to install that actually had a tolerance I needed to stick to I broke it. I just tightened the sink as hard as I could, thinking it would give a better seal. 

Then I got a new one and did it again 😄

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There is a PC workstation vendor called Thinkmate that does assembly about 90 minutes from my house. In my ideal world, I would like to review their assembly practices before I decide to purchase.   In my dream world, I work a deal where I consult with them to improve their operations for a significant discount.  I guess I just keep dreaming.

 

To put this "slightly" back on topic of C4D, I have a rather humorous story.  

 

I just finished co-writing a document for my company on "Design for Automated Assembly" (or DFAA) of electronic assemblies to show our designers how to design products so it is easier to automate their assembly.  During a peer review of that document, I flashed my desktop during a Web-Ex meeting which showed a CG tree and flowers made with Forestor.  People asked "where is that?" to which I answered that it was computer generated.  

 

Once the standards were completed (over 45 pages), they wanted to advertise their availability to the entire company using our network of TV's in every break-room and building lobby around the globe (it is a big company --- over 70,000 employees).  So they asked me if I could do "something on the computer" that they could show on those monitors.

 

That was about all the "brief" I got.  After I came up with something, it then went into review by everyone and there were some good comments made...but one thing I had to keep saying was "this is NOT my day job - I do have other things to do" because some of the suggestions got quite ambitious. 

 

Honestly, I really don't know how you professionals deal with real paying clients.  I got a slight taste of it and I must say you must have the patients of saints.

 

Anyway, here is the final result after many iterations (can anyone guess what the "very" subtle in-joke is?):

 

1100901702_FinalDFAA_9(1280x1024).thumb.png.a47fcffb2e319494de21327a30211195.png

 

Well....the day after it actually got broadcast-ed to all the break room and lobby monitors, every building got shut down due to COVID-19.  We have yet to re-open.

 

Oh well.

 

Dave

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  • Silver Contributor
9 hours ago, srek said:

My new AMD system was the first that i let the company i ordererd from assemble.

 

I've always used custom system builders in the past, but having recently stripped and rebuilt a couple of systems - power supply /motherboard / CPU change + all the bits and pieces - I was pondering building the next one myself. But I do agree: with the price of Threadripper parts - it's mightly expensive if you screw up - and the risk is right in your hands.

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  • Community Staff
1 hour ago, MikeA said:

 

I've always used custom system builders in the past, but having recently stripped and rebuilt a couple of systems - power supply /motherboard / CPU change + all the bits and pieces - I was pondering building the next one myself. But I do agree: with the price of Threadripper parts - it's mightly expensive if you screw up - and the risk is right in your hands.

Honestly if you even have the slightest idea of what you're doing and if you're following PC building guides there's pretty much nothing that can go wrong... I've built PCs all my life, both privately and at my workplace and I've never seen one fail, for any reason. It's so damn easy and the only thing you have to be SLIGHTLY careful with is the CPU. Don't drop it into the socket, don't overtighten it, check the orientation. That's about it.

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I had an old PC that I used for quite some time, got a new one, and stored the old one for a few years, one day i decided to reboot it, after I pressed the power button, I saw a flash of light coming from behind the case and a "puk" sound...followed by a little bit of smoke...there goes the PSU...who knows what made home inside of it or maybe it was just dust.

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4 minutes ago, Voidium said:

I had an old PC that I used for quite some time, got a new one, and stored the old one for a few years, one day i decided to reboot it, after I pressed the power button, I saw a flash of light coming from behind the case and a "puk" sound...followed by a little bit of smoke...there goes the PSU...who knows what made home inside of it or maybe it was just dust.

Well...depending on how old it was, it could be whole host of things that caused it to fail....but it wasn't dust.  Over time, the materials in the components and/or printed circuit boards do breakdown, especially if there is residual unactivated flux left on the board (you ever do you own plumbing and fail to wipe the flux off the copper pipe and after time there is this green all over the pipe?  Well, that happens to your motherboard too).  The insulating materials on inductor winding's can become brittle and crack or the epoxies used to hold the ferrite cores together break down.  Power supplies have some pretty big inductors.  Ceramic capacitors are essentially like little ceramic bricks and they do breakdown when exposed to humid environments over long periods of time - just like the bricks on buildings exposed too long to the rain.   Some things you just can't fight and age is one of them.  Everything decays over time (including my shoulder...but that's another issue).

 

All this stuff decaying increases the risk of electrical arcing when the current turns on and you get that distinctive "pop" (we call it "pop-corning" because of the sound).  

 

Now you can build electronics that can last 15 years, buried in a communications hut out in the middle of the desert or the Antarctic.  We've done and are still doing it because it is required.  Or the electronics that go into a person's pacemaker...they are even built to tighter standards.  But boy are they expensive.

 

But given the pace of technology, people do not want to keep their electronics for that long.  They want the next new thing....the next "shiny" ball. 

 

So, most consumer electronics are now built for 3 year life because that is about the average time people keep them.  There is an interesting product reliability curve called the "bath tub" curve that plots failure rates versus time (high at the beginning, low in the middle, and high at the end just like a cross section of a bathtub).  There is a very high "infant mortality" rate at the beginning usually due to build issues/mistakes in the build process that I talked about.  So you try to stress the products during factory testing to get those compromised products to fail early.  Once through that curve, the failure rate is very low until they start to hit a certain age and then the failure rate rises again.  Now, as I said, you can build products to make the low failure rate of the curve as long as possible, but if people are throwing away their products before then you are wasting money because it does cost more to build products that last.  Anyone willing to pay more for a cell phone that lasts 10 years?

 

That is why you rarely see warranties extend over 3 years for most consumer electronics. 

 

Dave

 

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35 minutes ago, 3D-Pangel said:

That is why you rarely see warranties extend over 3 years for most consumer electronics. 

I once worked in a high street white goods, TV + HiFi store. Everything came with a 1 year manufacturers guarantee and we were under strict  instructions to sell the customer an extended plan to cover years 2 - 5. Stuff usually fails either in the first few weeks or after 10 years, so our extended plans were pure profit.

 

The boss would let us do deals on the TVs to sell them, as long as the customer also bought the extended warranty.

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2 hours ago, Freemorpheme said:

I like it. Does the font have capital A that go both ways?

Interesting....I never noticed that.  But that is not the in-joke.  Given that we were talking about robotics, the font is from "The Terminator" movies.

Capture.thumb.JPG.7598478ae11fc90b28565c712996da25.JPG

 

There are actually web-sites where you can download peoples attempts to duplicate (but not 100% accurate as they are copy writed) fonts used in movies.  I guess inverting the A was one way to avoid copy write infringement.

 

My initial proposal was to make a short film.  The opening scene would be  close up of the Cisco sign that marks the entrance to our main campus in San Jose all burnt and destroyed.  Camera pulls back to reveal a post nuclear holocaust San Jose filled with destroyed buildings, flames, and smoke.  A Hunter Killer flies in the background firing its lasers.  A title card appears superimposed over all the carnage: "San Jose 2029".  The camera starts to pull back to reveal more devastation and a huge mushroom cloud rises up behind what is left of a burnt out building. The "San Jose 2029" title card is still  there and then underneath it (in a smaller font) another title card appears: "43 days left in the quarter".  This is an in-joke to my manufacturing friends as we are always mindful of making our quarterly production commitments ("we always make the quarter" is a commonly heard axiom)....which is kind of a funny thing to worry about after a nuclear war.

 

The camera continues to pull back with the Terminator theme music continuing to build with its hard drum beats rising in volume.  It comes to rest on a human skull and after a short beat a metal robotic foot comes crashing down completely shattering the skull.  The camera rises up to reveal a T-800 robot with is glowing red eyes staring straight at you.

 

The scene then completely cuts to a title card only (the music comes to abrupt stop with the classic screech sound of a person ripping a needle off a record player). The title card says "Well....that's one way to think about Cisco's future with automation".  Cut to a live action shot of someone dropping the DFAA guidelines on a person's desk. The title, "Design for Automated Assembly" is clearly visible.  Another title card then appears superimposed over that shot "Here's a better way"

 

I actually started working on it over a two week Christmas break.  Here is frame from a short test animation to work out the laser blasts done with XP and animation of the HK (everything was rigged to move - gun, engines, overall pitch and bank):

HK.thumb.JPG.53dd284285672119ac80b263c95a9693.JPG

 

Well they thought it was bit too violent for a visitor lobby but asked how long would it take to finish it.  I said about 6 months --- remember, this is NOT my day job.  And my day job is also my night job as I do have many nighttime meetings with various groups located on the other side of the planet.  Plus I wanted to give myself plenty of pad.  This is a hobby after all --- I don't want the stress of work to interfere with the thing I love to do.  Taking 6 months killed it.  So we went with the robot assembling the DFAA logo.  The Terminator font is all that remains as a little in-joke.

 

Dave

 

 

 

 

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  • 2 months later...
On 6/3/2020 at 3:29 PM, 3D-Pangel said:

Every now and then, I like to play around with a companies on-line PC configurator.  Some people like to look a fancy sport cars, boats, or homes.  I look to look at powerful computers.  But this one just blew me away:

 

  • 2 x Xeon Gold 6234 processors (3.3 GHz, 8 cores)
  • 128 Gb 2933MHz ECC RDIMM
  • 2 x NVIDIA Quadro RTX 5000 16Gb graphic cards
  • Intel VROC Premium M.2 RAID Controller
  • 2 x 1024 Gb SSD M.2 drives (RAID 1)  Boot Drive
  • 2 x 6TB SATA 7200 RPM SATA Drive (RAID 1)

 

and here is why it blew me away....

 

image.thumb.png.5f3583ae5e26cb4b0c00f43959358f13.png

 

Even if you don't believe in the $8000 savings, you have to admit that is a pretty good deal ($5030.61 USD).  But as far as entertainment value goes, configuring this machine actually made me wonder if the configurator was working!  The price was just not changing as much as you would expect! So I just kept going. Is this a 1 time in a hundred year sale due to COVID-19? 

 

Not sure. 

 

But it doesn't matter because I don't have the money nor the need for a new PC.  But it is nice to dream and one thing life has taught me is that dreams are cheap...so dream big.  Also, the wanting is always better than the having...

 

For those that do have the money and the need, the sale is still going on.

 

Dave

 

P.S. 

 

Dream PC is back for Labor Day.  Slightly higher price.  Still dreaming.

image.thumb.png.22b8fc716355f205bec88d0a23b82335.png

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It was outdated last year and its even more outdated this year, not sure how this is a dream PC

 

The GPUs are equivalent to a geforce 1080, an ok card but consider it is sitting at 2500 cuda cores and the new cards about to release go up to 10,500 cores and almost twice the memory.

 

Dual 8 core cpus, uggh, really? why? a single ryzen 3950x consumer cpu uses half the watts and is 25% faster, in a month or so the new zen is out which will probably be 50% faster, let alone edging into threadripper territory which will go multiple times faster.

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