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Guest customone

Using Veneer Wood Patterns

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Guest customone
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    yes sir ...Thats the ticket. worked like a charm

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    Your laminates look really great, and I think it is a fine idea to use Cinema to sell your pieces.

    I saw everyone having such fun in this thread, I had to join in. laugh.gif

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    Guest customone
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    DBrown,

    I see you substituted the crotch mahogany with the pau ferro. nice job. technically there not laminates or even cg images . rather table top veneer lay up that i make for furniture manufactures.

    The one thing i noticed about most renderings is that the wood textures look a bit fake. so having textures that represent the actual wood species might be of use to other designers who do office interiors or residential renderings.

    thanks for your input and again nice job on the table.

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    Guest Rem
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    I think Cinema 4d will do everything you need for furniture making. As a woodworker I started using AutoCAD in the late 90’s for 2d and 3d drawing and rendering. I took up C4d in ’05 to advance my rendering/visualization capabilities. While I still use AutoCAD often to get things started, most of my detailed modeling begins and ends in C4d. I output stl and 3ds files for CNC fabrication which can be directly imported into most CAM software packages with little or no tweaking.

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    One feature of C4d that you may find particularly useful would be the texture axis tool. If you build the geometry of the pattern you want (most likely as children of array objects) you can apply textures derived from your actual veneers (decent digital camera/tripod/Photoshop) and experiment with the layout of your cuts in real time.

    Here’s a relatively uninspired solid wood compass inlay (the customer’s always right). It’s the type of thing the CNC eats for breakfast.

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    Guest customone
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    Outstanding depiction on that staircase. The drop arm volute and newel are stunning. the more I look at the rendering its easy to see that you have an good eye for detail. Most people would not fart around with the herringbone brick pattern inside the fireplace.

    the compass is exceptional as well. i like the way you manipulated the wood grain. do you feel that c4d as a modeling software has more detail capabilities? if you had to combine a modeling software and a rendering software what would you pick. money being no option. is your work done on a pc or mac? i'm a mac and will probably never change.

    thanks for the insight and inspiration.

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    Cinema 4d has all the geometric capability of the major CAD programs (which isn’t saying all that much) plus the native rendering power you’ve seen. Generally speaking, the 3d software manufacturers keep up with each other so I think your choice can be made based on UI and compatibility with your existing software and drafting procedures. Cinema 4d’s interface is especially intuitive and adaptable. For simple 2d drafting it’s a bit cumbersome, though. That’s when I use AutoCAD in tandem, adding elements whenever needed as 3ds imports.

    I’m PC-based. For a Mac studio I see that Cobalt supports .dwg and .dxf, which is good for ‘playing with others’. If it will export .3ds files you can have a pretty seamless integration with C4d. C4d handles .obj imports pretty well, too. If you can run them side by side and swap files back and forth, I think you’re good to go. Experiment a bit with import/export. Outside of 2d drafting/dimensioning, C4d’s all you need. Wait till you see how easy it is to switch materials on the fly. Check out Sketch and Toon for different presentation options.

    Thanks for the kind comments! My mind boggles at the 'money's no option' option.

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    PS. AutoCAD is no slouch! I modeled the wrought iron balusters entirely in ACAD. When it came time to bend a few to a specific radius, C4d handled it nicely.

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    Guest customone
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    yeah... everybody i know has Autocad. one problem though. OSX operating system. i'm sure i could upgrade mine to a dual core or install virtual pc on it but my "Hal 9000" would not appreciate it.

    I am entertaining buying a new Mac with Intel just for 3d and Cad software. i'm open for all suggestions.

    a little humor.

    http://www.palantir.net/2001/tma1/wav/foolprf.wav

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    How about picking up a used PC? A second machine can be pretty handy. When I'm busy I work with 3 computers and 4 screens. It also spreads out the CPU load when running multiple apps or long renders, etc.

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