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Are Ngons Aways Bad?

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I have the impression you haven't realy recognized what n-gons are for. You don't add them later or reduce tris and quads to n-gons at the end of the modelling process.The whole idea behind n-gons is not to have to worry to much about adding and changing geometry during modeling. Ngons make it simpler to cut, bevel, extrude etc. They allow you to produce a cleaner mesh in shorter time.Like remi said, it's about efficency and in the end good and useable geometry.CheersBjörn

Very well said! This is exactly my workflow when modeling for non subd.

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I have the impression you haven't realy recognized what n-gons are for.

Björn

I know what Ngons are for just as well as you do.

The problem is I was unclear with my wording. I didn't mean "add them to a model later" I meant they should be added to your modeling repertoire after you know how to solve modeling problems using all quads. That way Ngons are not a crutch. It's fine using them to save time in a hard surface, but that is not often necessary if you're a proficient modeler. 

It's important for a beginner to know how to achieve a clean mesh, and use shortcuts later in the learning process.

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Ngons, schmengons ... use 'em all the time. If you're getting paid for your work, you need to satisfy your customer. If you want to be paid well, you need to work efficiently. A lot of my modeling is screen to machine and most often CAD programs. Horse went to a sign-maker (his lettering) and C4D/mostly quads made sense. Receiver is a plastic-injection mold design with C4D just hosting Maxwell Render for visualization.

 

Wonderful model, Varanid!

Thanks Remi.

I've made friends with them as well in certain situations - everything I use them for though I know how to achieve without them if necessary - which is key IMHO.

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learning when and why to use gnons is different then actually using them.

its necessary for beginners to learn about ngons so then they know how to model without them.

learning about ngons doesnt mean they are going to use the as a crutch.

thats like teaching a medical student a surgery procedure and not telling them what they shouldnt do during that surgery.

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I never said they shouldn't learn about N-gons, I said they shouldn't get in the habit of using them as a crutch.

Pretty simple

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I am with Varanid 100%. But if you guys have other ideas for Ngons,then let it be,I will not get in argue here,I made my point,its up to people to decide what they want to pursue. 

And Varanid,please post pic of that plane without HN on,thank you. :)

 

Cheers,

Igor


| MAXON Quality Assurance Specialist | 3D Asset Creator | C4D Cafe Manager |

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Well the problem with using the Mustang to illustrate this is that this model is heavily subdivided in order to minimize stretching during the texturing process, and

also to hold detail. I keep multiple lower res versions of all the parts in case I need to backtrack (which happens) but subdivided when I was happy with how

everything looked. This is sort of "version 2.0" of my aircraft modeling workflow.  So the difference between the SubD and Non-SubD state is fairly subtle. But I'll post a shot.

 

The Hellcat on the other hand, which was my first aircraft better illustrates what is possible with less geometry. Not that I won't model this way on aircraft in the future - just depends on the bird. The Mustang presented some challenges - I wanted all those panel lines in the cowl to be actual panels, not drawn lines.

Here is "relaxed" version of the Mustang, as well as the Hellcat and it's engine with and without subD.

I'd post high res, final profile illustrations, but I had posting that stuff on the net.

post-87779-0-60970800-1374625542_thumb.j

post-87779-0-78758000-1374625609_thumb.j

post-87779-0-48754100-1374625875_thumb.j

post-87779-0-07147100-1374625909_thumb.j

post-87779-0-64236500-1374626143_thumb.j

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Note the use of N-gons on the bottom of the wing to hold that odd, very difficult shape of the landing gear cutout.

This is a very useful technique, especially on aircraft skins where the metal undulates anyway, making the little artifact that often

results on the slightly curved surface a non-issue.

post-87779-0-59177000-1374626511_thumb.j

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Note the use of N-gons on the bottom of the wing to hold that odd, very difficult shape of the landing gear cutout.

This is a very useful technique, especially on aircraft skins where the metal undulates anyway, making the little artifact that often

results on the slightly curved surface a non-issue.

 

Exactly my point. Ngons used properly are a valuable tool, not an error.

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  • Wow, Varanid. Those models are great. Can I ask a question about your technique? On the tight corners of the landing gear and the inset above the wing you have these loop cuts on the edges. You seem to use this a lot, and looks like a great way to control your edge flow. Is this the same technique covered in this video?

     

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