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rayman

How long did it take for you?

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rayman    0

Hi! I would like to open a thread aimed to all 3d professionals (in any field) that make a living in this industry (in any way). Especially I would like to know how much time passed since you started your formation as artists, designers, architects, etc, I mean, not in 3d, but since you began to acquire an artistic or technical base in any field (either academically or self-taught), and the moment that you started to make a living in the 3d industry. The thing is that I have read a lot of similar threads (asking how much time needed to master 3d, etc), but I have never seen one that raises the subject this way, and because of that I would like all those who want tell your story here (a brief summary of it, of course).  

PD: I would also appreciate it if you share any link to any thread very similar to this (if you know someone:-)
 

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Cerbera    1,023

3D has always been a hobby for me (15 years+), and I was a web designer for a living, so already had the 2D sh*t down, but when I realised I enjoyed 3D more than web design I began working doubly hard to fill the gaps in my 3D knowledge, and to specialise in at least one field (modelling in my case). I waited 5 years before I went  part-time commercial, and 7 years to go full -time, mainly to ensure that I was at least approaching expert is most areas of the program, and could solve 98% of problems on my own.  Some people say I waited too long, but I disagree. Rather too often on this forum we get people who are patently unqualified to be doing commercial work, and yet still they try, before coming on here and pleading for deadline-based help when they come unstuck at the first client hurdle !  :) But we're all different, and learn at different rates - I have also seen people who are producing astonishing work within 6 months to a year, but they are few and far between, and tend to be able to spend all day every day learning their toolset, so are putting in the same huge amount of effort, but getting through it faster.

CBR

 

 

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VECTOR    290

Started with 2d graphics design while i was still at school, started with 3d around 3 years ago, took atleast a year to start producing anything resembling quality and another year and a half on top of that to start making stuff people would consider paying for, doesn't sound like a lot of time, and relatively speaking its not but that times been spent craming as much modelling practice and techniques into my spare time as possible, still loads to learn but know enough now to be offerd some fairly big jobs and recommendations. 

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mattbowden    15

I actually went to college for Media Broadcasting. I worked for MTV, even won an Emmy. Then parted ways and started working as a D.P. I always loved post production and got to the point that I no longer wanted the type of lifestyle befitting a traveling D.P.  Through college and after I spent loads of freetime learning after effects etc. Never branched out into 3D. Didn't have access to the software. Then about 5 years ago I downloaded Blender and was hooked. I took a job in post production that allowed me to grow my After Effects skills while I dabbled in 3D for fun on nights and weekends. Three years into that job my company shut down it's production/media department. Through contacts that I had made at said company I was offered a position as an editor at a new company. They saw some of my side 3D work and loved it. That was April of 2015. They bought C4D for me and told me that they wanted me to be their full time in house 3D/VFX artist. I said yeah I can totally do that (while I was actually thinking what the hell are you doing you've never done any commercial work before). It's been awesome.

So my story seems to lean towards what Cerbera warned against. And while I do agree with him in part on a few things I do think that you can do anything you put your mind to. If you have the drive and determination you can succeed. I've asked for pointers a few times and hope it didn't come across as deadline-based. LoL. But I do see where he is coming from. 

In my first year I literally worked 7 days a week up to 22 hours a day to get stuff done. It was trial by fire. It's still that way sometimes and I am FAR from an EXPERT. But I have a solid fundamental understanding and always have ideas on where to start. This makes it easier for me to find out how to do stuff by creative problem solving.

I also have a strong support system that I've been lucky to be a part of. i found an awesome group in my area called CAVEMODE (Charlotte Area Visual Effects and Motion Design) and have made so many awesome contacts. Good friends that I can call or message if I'm in a bind that are happy to help or let me pick their brain. Find a good community, get involved. You'll make friends that are invested in your success that are willing to put in the effort to help.

Also, my case is kind of rare though with regards to my company. They are totally supportive and to a very specific and small level has a bit of understanding that I'm not an artist with 15 years experience. They do still require and expect the world from me. It's hard being directly managed by someone who has no clue what goes into 3D work.

I rambled on long enough. But I wasn't classically trained. I am self taught. I spend ridiculous amounts of time reading, watching tutorials and doing everything possible to get my work done. And in doing so I am learning my way through C4D. If you find someone willing to pay you to for your work and there is a very clear understanding on what you could provide I say go for it. No matter how much experience you have. Doing client work is SO much different than playing with tutorials on your own. 

Here's a few pieces that I worked on through this past year. They aren't amazing but I am super proud of them. My name is Matt. I'm a full time 3D Artist and the sole artist for my entire company. I've been a professional artist for about a year and a half and will never do anything else.

 

 

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BigAl3D    33

@mattbowden Very nice work for such a short time in 3D! The camera work is also excellent, but I suppose you have a lot of expertise in that area. 

::):

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mattbowden    15
1 hour ago, BigAl3D said:

@mattbowden Very nice work for such a short time in 3D! The camera work is also excellent, but I suppose you have a lot of expertise in that area. 

::):

Hey, thanks! I do have to say that having a background in production has really benefited me. I use Octane as my main renderer and approaching my 3D scenes the same way I would a location shoot has been really helpful.

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nicks    6

@mattbowden, you are way too humble - your showreel is fantastic!

How long have you been using Octane? I've been toying with the idea of picking up a copy...

Cheers,

Nick

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mattbowden    15
On 4/27/2017 at 11:03 PM, nicks said:

@mattbowden, you are way too humble - your showreel is fantastic!

How long have you been using Octane? I've been toying with the idea of picking up a copy...

Cheers,

Nick

Oh man. Thanks, Nick. I appreciate your feedback. It makes me so happy to hear that other 3D artists like my work. I work from home and don't get lots of feedback from my bosses, lol. I'll send you a PM so as not to derail the thread here with Octane mumbo jumbo. lol

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javigildd    2

Three years maybe. It all started with Final Cut, I began taking a few tutorials for an upcoming project I had back in the day. I remember I squeezed every drop of the program, and then the title tool built on it became small, and I started playing around with Motion.

Then I got like "Man, I love this stuff", and I enrole a two years Associative's Degree in Media, where I learned Premiere, and lately After effects. And I remember my mind blowing up like "My oh my, that's it", and then it was After Effects and nothing else. Then came Maya, and it never really got me.

I started to work for a National Tv Channel (I still work there nowadays), where I learned Viz Artist from VizRt, and then Cinema 4D, the only 3D software that has caught me since the beggining.

So, a life? I still feel like a rookie, even doing a living with it. Never stop learning, that's my trick!

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madmotion    0

Somewhat OT but wondered if any of you had backgrounds in the broadcasting/TV effects space.

Been considering moving into that field post uni having learnt C4D, but with the rise of Netflix would love to get the perspectives of someone in the industry.

Is the broadcast/TV effects space still growing or should I look at alternative areas?

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