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Kima

How much to charge?

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Kima    0

I may have some freelance work coming up and I was wondering if I could get peoples opinions on what to charge.   Its for a  30-45 second motion graphic.      The person has said they would need a turn around in 24 hours.   Is this realistic?   I guess it would depend on what it involves but generally speaking.   How much would you charge? 

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Simmy    50

Its a tight turnaround for an animation. It depends on the complexity and prep work needed. Then you have to take into account render time. If you have lots of reflections and transparencies etc. you may be late on delivery. You will need to try and keep it under 1 min per frame I think. If you have a powerful rig though it might help a lot.

 

For the rate I guess the best idea is to pick a hourly rate you are happy with and charge 24 of them? (it can render while you sleep although that can be a danger as you will not spot any errors until much later)

 

I think without more knowledge on the brief it may be hard to tell you how realistic it is.

 

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Cutman    123

30-45 secs in 24 hrs? Completely unrealistic for anything like decent quality work.

 

These types of jobs have a very probability of not getting paid at the end of them. Approach with extreme caution. The 'client' clearly doesn't have much of a regard or understanding of 3D mograph production and in my experience these clients are a menace and simply not worth taking on.

 

I would quote 3x my hourly rate and would want at least 50% up front before even opening C4D and the rest of the money before you release the completed work. I've met shysters who try to use urgent deadlines to get work sent then pay later only they never pay later.

 

We never take on work like this unless it's for a friend and we're helping them out of an emergency and even then it wouldn't be 30 secs of animation in 24 hrs.

 

 

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Cerbera    1,017

Yep, what he said. You'd have to have some pretty incredible skills, and immediate feedback from client at several key stages to have any hope of turning that round in 24 hours.

 

CBR

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VECTOR    290

I'll do it for 10,000

  • Haha 1

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Cerbera    1,017

I'll do it for 9, 995 ;)

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VECTOR    290
1 minute ago, Cerbera said:

I'll do it for 9, 995 ;)

how about we charge 12000 and give someone else 2000 to do it and split the 10 k 50 50 

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Cerbera    1,017
Just now, VECTOR said:

how about we charge 12000 and give someone else 2000 to do it and split the 10 k 50 50 

Done :)

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VECTOR    290

I love it wen a plan comes together 

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arail    22

One thing to keep in mind - clients often don't know how long things take. When they come to you with an unrealistic schedule and you're not able to complete the project in time, they think it's fair not to pay. It's not so much they intend to rip you off but they've created an impossible situation without knowing they've done so and then blame you for the consequences. It's part of our job as the artist to give them an estimate of how long projects will actually take. 

 

As others have said - make sure you get a reasonable amount of money up front.

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VECTOR    290
32 minutes ago, arail said:

One thing to keep in mind - clients often don't know how long things take. When they come to you with an unrealistic schedule and you're not able to complete the project in time, they think it's fair not to pay. It's not so much they intend to rip you off but they've created an impossible situation without knowing they've done so and then blame you for the consequences. It's part of our job as the artist to give them an estimate of how long projects will actually take. 

 

As others have said - make sure you get a reasonable amount of money up front.

Basically this. unless it's through a middleman, or agent etc that are outsourcing it to you, then in general clients really have very little idea of what's involved, thus have completely unrealistic expectations  time wise, and money wise, i had a guy basically straight up insult me when i gave him a quote of minimum 8 hours, to model this portable ventilator model properly, clean quad based mesh, he also wanted it on his desk by monday morning, (he contacted me late friday night) i offered to do it for 6 as the lowest as a favour, he then told me he got another quote for 3 hours and i was basically taking the pisss, after i told him it was near on impossible to model that thing properly in 3 hours, you can guess what probably happened come that monday morning when he received the model. Also a lot of people out there wanting something for nothing. luckily a client i've been working with quite a lot lately is literally a dream to work with, then again, he's outsourcing it to me, but i always get detailed well written and laid out briefs and feedback, and prompt payment, he's always offered to pay some upfront and pays extra for revisions etc, but unfortunately these are far and few between 

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Decarlo    3

I agree with all the above.  Tell them upfront that it is unlikely that it could be completed by their deadline and ask what the contingency is. If it's all or nothing, just walk away; the deadline will pass, they'll be forced to make a new plan, and may come back to you anyway. 

 

For pay, I'd give them your hourly rate, then quote time and a half for every hour over 8 you have to work in a given day.  Let them see that waiting to the last minute and expecting you to work around the clock to finish it is going to cost them extra.  As others have mentioned, they probably don't understand the process or respect the work, and just as they waited to the last minute to get it done, it is unlikely that they budgeted for it, and will expect to pay close to nothing. "It's just one day of work, after all." they'll say to justify paying you next to nothing.

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