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Havealot

Maxon
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Havealot last won the day on November 5 2019

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About Havealot

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    Cafe Ronin

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  • First Name
    Sebastian
  • Last Name
    Hapot

Cinema 4D Information

  • C4D Version
    R21

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  1. I fear the most straight forward answer is going to be Python Field / Effector.
  2. Hi Sophia, You should be able to find some on Youtube. Greyscale Gorilla posted has some basic tutorials done by Chris Schmidt. EJ (eyedesign) has some on youtube as well. While many people these days prefer video tutorials I still believe it is helpful to read the manual. All Xpresso nodes are explained in the c4d help. In most cases you won't be needing all of them but knowing what is possible will help you with future projects as you will know where to look.
  3. There are several ways of doing this. Here are a few: 1: Xpresso driving offset - Create an Xpresso tag, drag A onto the canvas, click on the red corner of the node and pick the position port from the menu - Drag B onto the canvas and add a position input (blue corner) - Create a constant node, set it to vector and set the offset according to your needs - Create a math node set it to vector and make sure the function is set to "add" - Wire the position of A into the first input of the math node - Wire the output of the constant node into the second input of the math node - Wire the output of the math node into the position input of B - Now B should inherit the position animation of A but with the offset set in the constant node 2. Null driving offset - Create an Xpresso tag, drag A onto the canvas, click on the red corner of the node and pick the position port from the menu - Drag B onto the canvas and add a position input (blue corner) - Wire the position output of A into the position input of B - Create a null object and make object be child of it - Move the null to where you want the animation to happen - Now B should inherit the position animation of A but relative to the position of the null 3. Constraints (no Xpresso) - Create a PSR constraint tag - Go to the PSR tab and drag A into the target slot - Unfold "Offset" and change the XYZ offset - Now B should inherit the position animation of A but with the offset defined in the constraint tag And in case you don't know, you can easily create the basic setup from the context menu. Right-click the parameter you want on the source object (A) and pick "Xpressions -> Set Driver" from the context menu. Do the same on the parameter of your target object but this time pick "Set Driven". An Xpresso tag will be created automatically with the node and ports you need. I suggest to watch a few Xpresso beginner tutorials. Xpresso is old but opens up a lot of possibilities if you are willing to learn it. This is really the most trivial thing it can do.
  4. The MoGraph Matrix can be deformed by deformers. So clone matrices onto your particles, deform the matrices and clone your bubbles onto the matrices to keep them from being deformed. Example attached. matrix_deform_particles.c4d
  5. You can do it in the formula itself by adding the clone ID ("id") to the project time ("t") in your formula. Alternatively you can bake the animation into keyframes and use the time offset. If you want to step through your clones the examples of Dr. Sassi are the way to go.
  6. It might also be possible to automate that with constraints or Xpresso. But for a one time application / rig it is probably easier to eyeball it. That's what I meant by "more plausible".
  7. Here is an example with joints/bones as you suggested. I re-modeled a slice of the shape, rigged it and cloned the result. The subdivision generators are just there to create a bit of smoothing. But there are other ways of doing that (e.g. weighting on high res and using deformers with a restriction tag). The animation is on the joints and could probably use a bit of love to look more plausible. package_002.c4d
  8. Apparently axonometric views are not supported.
  9. You can use the step field layer to have an offset based on the clone index. I've attached an example. circels_0001.c4d
  10. Let me know how it went. Curious to know if its actually useful or just has a hacky gimmick feel.
  11. Those are great looking results. And since the needles tend to grow in a more or less fixed spacing and alignment it is totally plausible.
  12. The workflow may not come premade, but if you like working that way you can set it up using hair and cloner. I've attached an example. It's not straight forward but once you've figure it out you can save it as a template. Hair has a paint tool called "Add Guides" which has all the setting you need (like min spacing). Instead of producing hair splines you can instance objects. My example instances a single poly per guide to provide the position and the alignment to the cloner. Now it is just a matter of providing the needle geo that you would like to use and start painting. Variations in size, rotation or color can be done with effectors. Make sure to have the hair object selected when painting. painting_needles2.mov painting_needles.c4d
  13. Here is a completely Fields based solution. Add any Fields you want as a mask or multiplier to change speed, offset or radius. disc_circle 03.c4d
  14. Hey Cerbera, you are right, I didn't try on the original OP file. I was just challenging your statement that MoGraph caches only record effectors. Not a solution for the OPs problem. Maybe I should have pointed out. Softbodies deform the object itself and as far as I know point deformation is not stored in MoGraph caches. Cheers; Havealot
  15. Not sure what you do differently, but it's working for me. MoCache_dynamics.c4d
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