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rasputin

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rasputin last won the day on December 31 2019

rasputin had the most liked content!

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41 Noble Beginner

About rasputin

  • Rank
    C4D worshipper

Profile Information

  • First Name
    david lincoln
  • Last Name
    brooks
  • C4D Version
    R20.026 Studio
  • Website URL
    https://www.facebook.com/rasputin1963
  • Skype
    grigorei_rasputin
  • CPU/GPU
    CPU
  • Location
    Texas USA

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  1. Here's one you should watch also: https://study.com/academy/lesson/what-are-the-principles-of-art-definition-examples.html
  2. It sounds like you just need to jump in to making imagery with 3D... Hopefully MAXON Cinema4D. We like to say that artistic ability is an inborn gift, but that's not altogether true: there are many, many artistic ideas that you can grasp just from reading and studying about them. So I say: go dive in to studying both art theory while you learn the technical aspects of doing 3D... They go hand-in-hand. There's that saying by L'ao-Tsu: "The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step." I suggest that, every day, you make a 3D render, however simple and humble it may be, in which you try to learn one or more artistic principles. You are lucky in that the Internet now provides you will loads and loads of instructional material, in the form of free instructional videos. Bear in mind that learning a software as deep and complex as Cinema4D will take some time. As in: years. So the only task left is to jump into the swimming pool and get wet.
  3. Whoa-- amazing! It was only when camera dollied back that I perceived what you had achieved. Amazing and very tricky to do. Is that a phi (golden ratio) spiral?
  4. rasputin

    Isolated

    So very beautiful... and so very strange...
  5. rasputin

    Rasputin's Gallery III

    Collection of my newer images, all modeled in Cinema 4D and mostly rendered with Corona Renderer. Enjoy.
  6. Yes, but to actively work on that hair-- brush it, etc.-- don't you have to select it active?
  7. Good god. Absolutely amazing. I saw the movie three times over the Thanksgiving holiday, and not once did I twig on that there might be some digital trickery going on with their faces. The illusion was seamless. I'm guessing ILM possesses some extremely powerful computers; anything less would make this process a nightmare. Wow. And I guess ILM has enough money and power to completely commission a new dedicated proprietary software expressly for their purposes from code programmers. Somehow, at the end of the day, they had to construct a mesh for the actors' faces, that they could then play with. And that mesh is surprisingly low-poly, yet flawlessly topologized and rigged with custom morphs. Maybe the three-headed camera did a kind of photogrammetry? Even still, I'll bet they still couldn't fully automate this process; ie., they still had to do a lot of frame-by-frame editing. It also looks like they made meshes out of the surrounding walls and furniture... I guess they had to do that to keep perspective and focal length correct? Kinda wild that DeNiro still remembered his monologue from GOODFELLAS, 25 years on; do all movie actors do that? Hvala na ovom videu, Igore!
  8. Hey you Hair wizards, Is there any way to turn off the visibility of my Hair guides... while leaving visible my Preview Hair Polygons? ie., in my Viewport, not during final render. See my screencap? I want to temporarily turn off visibility of my blue guide lines, while leaving visible only the hair preview itself (shown at 25% visibility). This is because, of course, I have dialed in curly waves into my C4D Hair Material, which appear quite differently than the straight guides do. The blue guides are preventing me from seeing well the actual Hair preview. Thanks, ras
  9. ....and here's an even better starting attempt, I think you'll agree. I'm really beginning to see the beauty and logic of Sub-D modeling! If you do it right, your mesh is always pretty and logical, and has not a single polygon too many. Thank you for your help here, Cerbera!
  10. Cerbera, Is THIS the idea? I started with a cube primitive, elongated it, and applied a SUB-D SURFACE to it, shown here subdivided 2X. So it's a process of applying appropriate cuts-- avoiding triangulation-- then gradually moving your points closer to your ideal?
  11. Thanks, cerbera! Would you believe I've never modeled in the Sub-D approach before? This looks like a good time to learn it. I had been trying to do this shoe first using the Loft-ing of splines... pretty tricky. Then i got the wild idea to place a sphere primitive around my (Poser) foot mesh, then do a Cloth Sim 'til it hugs the foot tightly. Both of these methods yield a ghastly topology which is tricky to then refine using the Mesh Brush tool. I keep thinkin' there's GOT to be an easier way. I so appreciate your help here! Thanks, ras
  12. Hey guys, I'm curious: How would YOU go about modeling this shoe? My Poser figure is supposed to wear them. My results have been... barely passable, not that good at all. I've been using the Poser figure's foot mesh to serve as a possible "shoe last", ya might say... The difficulty, of course, is that the shape is VERY organic... hardly a straight line on the whole shoe. And as you can imagine, I end up with polys wildly angled everywhere, and in very diverse sizes... ie., lousy topology. Don't worry about the heel, the little bow or the decorative perforations-- I'm just concerned with modeling the basic shape of the "chassis". Is there an especially "clean", efficient or elegant way to go about modeling this shoe? Thanks, ras
  13. Thanks so much, cerbera! Your erudition and counsel here on the Cafe is a godsend. Where can I obtain a Hexasphere, just for visual comparison?
  14. rasputin

    Roland SH-09

    Bravissimo. I've modeled 3D synths before, and I know how jolly hard they are to texture. Specifically if you don't have a proper ("brand official") texturing source of the symbols/verbiage on the synth's interface. I, for one, know that you have to model FIVE different types of white-key shapes! I like the ageing you've done on this 1970's unit, too. Scuffed edges and yellowed keys from playing in too many smoky bars, haha. Even the dirt that tends to linger up in the hard-to-clean crevices of the keys! Did you model this, if I may ask, just by eyeballing a photograph of the synth?

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